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The Journal of Edward Ward 1850-51

Monday, September 23rd

Monday, September 23rd

After a very hot night, in which very heavy rain was heard on deck, was much refreshed by a shower bath. A page break
The Cabin Plan of the 'Charlotte Jane'This was the booking plan for Chief Cabin and Intermediate Class passengers. According to one record the Ward brothers occupied the two cabins shown at the bottom right of the Lower Deck plan.

The Cabin Plan of the 'Charlotte Jane'
This was the booking plan for Chief Cabin and Intermediate Class passengers. According to one record the Ward brothers occupied the two cabins shown at the bottom right of the Lower Deck plan.

page 33flying fish flew on deck, and of course was nabbed. He appeared something like a herring without scales, with wings, of course, of a very fine membrane. A shark—the newest wonder of the deep—hove his dorsal fin in sight about breakfast time, but only a favoured few caught sight of him. Mrs McCormick still very ill with seasickness, and faint for want of eatable food. Lat. 18.47. We have run 203 miles in the last twentyfour hours, to the South. In the evening after sundown the wind had fallen nearly to a calm, and the close heat was most oppressive. The passengers lounged about in uneasy postures, like in a fever hospital, and all walking, and of course dancing, was out of the question. Cholmondeley,* Wortley, Bowen, Mr and Mrs Kingdon, FitzGerald and I clustered on a corner of the poop and played at inventing a story, which passed from mouth to mouth with abrupt transition. This afterwards changed to poetry and after one had composed a line the rest had to invent a rhyme to it. It was excessively amusing, and would have gone far into the night had not Bob and Crib abused their privilege of coming to the poop and begun to fight, to the discomfiture and dispersion of all the ladies. We stayed on deck a long time, and found it afterwards hard to leave it for the close 'tween decks. The Captain assures us it will be at least ten degrees hotter!

* Thomas and Charles Cholmondeley were closely related to the Marquis of Cholmondeley and were cousins of Lord Delamare. They established themselves at Port Levy, and members of the family later had property at Governors Bay.

Charles Bowen, senior, became Speaker of the Canterbury Provincial Council. His son Charles Christopher (later Sir Charles) Bowen was secretary to J. R. Godley, and became Provincial Treasurer in 1854. He took a leading part in the movement for the establishment of Canterbury University College, and brought forward in Parliament his Education Bill which became law in 1877, establishing the present New Zealand system of free, secular and compulsory education.