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The Pamphlet Collection of Sir Robert Stout: Volume 81

The Republic as a Trade School

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The Republic as a Trade School

Last year the Republic entered upon a new and very important era of industrial life. For several years the Industries—farm, bakery, laundry, plumbing shop, furniture stop, printing shop etc. had been doing good work considering the very limited equipment at hand. Our hum, with 350 acres of land, 27 cows and 11 horses did not provide for our needs as it should, because, in the first place, there were too many demands upon the time and resources of the head farmer and teams: and in the second place there was not nearly enough stock to con-some the hay and fodder raised or to produce nearly enough butter and milk for our own use.

This condition on the farm was typical of every department in the Republic; there was just enough machinery and equipment in each one to "name the place" but not sufficient to carry out the work with efficiency and satisfaction, to say nothing of profit.

It is the theory of the present management that our industries can be made to pay a good profit in money and turn out a very much higher grade of workmanship by bring properly equipped. Many good friends of the Republic have come to coincide with us in this belief with the result that funds have been furnished by Mr. John D. Rockefeller and Mr. V. Everit Macy of New York City for the purpose of completing such equipment. Much has already been done. Our dairy has increased from 27 to 60 head; our horses from 11 to 14. A blacksmith shop is m successful operation. The laundry has a complete outfit of the best made washing machinery.

The bakery has a new "Ordway" oven with a capacity of 300 loaves of bread: the furniture shop has $300 worth of new tools and machinery; the plumbing shop has new quarters and many new tools: a sewing school has been page break started and several machines are in operation; the printing industry has been moved into a beautiful new brick building and its equipment completed.

Nevertheless, with all of this new machinery and with a better grade of help our advance along the lines of industrial efficiency has not been quite satisfactory. It is true that we have greatly decreased the operating expenses of many departments: it is also true that those departments showing a loss, show a much smaller loss than in former years. During the year just closed, for the first time, each and every department had to bear all expenses chargeable against that department: such items as stationery, printing, sundry supplies, repairs, rent, heat, light, power, etc., have all been charged against the department and not against general maintenance, improvement, equipment, etc., as in former years.

Two other very important factors also entered into our affairs of 1910 which greatly handicapped the work of the regular departments: one was the large number of collateral enterprises going on in the Republic, the building of the gymnasium, the hotel and the new addition to the school house. These operations called for a great deal of work from the boys and teams: our Carpenter Shop, Repair Department, Plumbing Shop and Machine Shop were constantly crowded and interfered with by the extra work they were doing for these buildings. This extended over a period of seven months. In the second place the demands upon the time and attention of the Superintendent in connection with the extensive building program greatly interfered with the supervision and general oversight of the regular department work: therefore the plans and policies so carefully worked out the year before were not fully, and in some cases not wisely, worked out. It is not to be expected that we shall ever again face so many difficulties in one season. With the time and thought of the Superintendent free to carefully and constantly direct the affairs of the several departments and study their needs, it is to be expected they will make much better progress.

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The following is a comparative statement which shows the increase or decrease in the operating expenses of the several departments.

1908 1909 1910 Showing Decrease in 1910 S howing Increase in 1910 (a)Salaries 13237.82 16274.87 17689. 89 1415.02 (a)Meat 1963.54 399,89 1507.31 1218.02 (a) Groceries 5664.08 4770.71 5655,47 884.76 (a) Bread 1520.65 1596-69 1948,05 648,66 Clothing 3273 69.96 28.48 41.48 Other Goods 2377.00 1821.95 1650.22 171.73 Postage Stat' ery 499.25 450.87 533+62 82.75 Light 368.43 361.13 397.73 36.62 Fuel 5472.23 3678.62 4265.11 586.49 Medical 999.15 510.09 479.42 13.57 Tartu 5437.70 4783.63 4133.04 650.59 Furniture 695,58 400.75 503.51 102.76 E'lumbing 3195.06 2067.54 619.71 1447.83 Repairs H49.70 850.4 678.23 171.81 Gen'l Improv"m ts-2012.27 1926.65 1229.90 696.65 Chapel £4,00 56.00 (b)Other Purposes 1002.89 2178.27 1826.07 352.70 (c)Am. Money 3669.17 6542.43(d)3169.64 3372.79 W.R. George Cot. 1999.96 1999.9ft S68.16 1131.82 Telegrams 56.45 47.00 56.09 Printing 672. So 909.23 586. H 223.12 Hospital 83.42 180.00 Chicken Industry m 100rll 2.26 17.85 Blacksmith Shop 259, si 124.66 135.15 $51, 831.26 53,716.65 48,349.69 8,427.09 5,080.75 Balance to gain $3, 346.34 (A) This increase is largely flue to the fact that the central dining room was given up. There are now ten dining rooms in the place of one, All cake, cookies, doughnuts, breakfast roll, are now made in the bakery and sold to the cottages through the store but all are charged up as bread in this report; hence the increase. (b) This includes expenses of runaways traveling, all telephone tolls on all lines, etc. (c) Includes all goods purchased for store and citizens, also all money redeemed for citizens, hair cuts, shoe repairs, etc. (d) Inventory of goods in the store, $1,853,20

Comparative Statement of Operating Expenses

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Department lnventory Expences Sales Loss Bread Bakery 1909 1910 1909 1910 1909 1910 1909 1910 1909 1910 1909 1910 1909 1910 1909 1910 1909 1910 Dr. 3,228.01 4.447.17 Dr. 1.107.04 11. 670 98 4,44776 4,447.55 1,354.11 4.593.83 2.20 1.00 4.053.75 2.789.09 8.808.12 14.864.00 17.703 40 1.926.65 1,229.90 Cr. 1,382.28 1,410 98 Cr. 6.916.08 6,690.42 1,045,01 1,668.28 4,746.52 3,531.61 4,863.04 4,543.13 1.786.01 2,85874 741.00 1,190.46 Wafer Bakery Laundry 3,911.74 3,724.85 3,301.09 3.505.41 83478 1,561.95 1,561.95 1,027.72 +768,56 905.00 2,855 82 193.74 Plumbing Shop Furniture Shop 6,067.21 3,684.99 3.2I6.12 2,813.14 3.109.02 3,806.55 11.737.52 13,639,00 6,325.74 3,758.14 3,410.61 2,044.58 2,204.02 3,823 08 14,237.86 10783.18 258.53 73.15 194,49 Print Shop 16.53 CHICKENS FARM GENERAL IMPROVEMENTS 102.12 2.500,36 Paid all Citizens Wages. $1398.96 Five months shut down for repairs and work on other buildings This serious loss is due to three factors: (A) A change of formers and the inexperience of the new man with boy help. (B) A serious drought which continued through out July. August and half of September and which caused the almost total failure of the potato crop and greatly injured the com crop. (C) The death of two valuable horses from acute indigestion.

A Few Figures taken from the Department Ledger, October 1st., 1910

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Exterior of the Franklin Print Shop

Exterior of the Franklin Print Shop

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Interior of the Franklin Print Shop

Interior of the Franklin Print Shop

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Expense Income Loss 1908 3095.43 2764,94 330.49 Carter 1909 1743.12 686.93 1054.19 1910 1848.73 930.76 917.87 1908 2751.17 1414.97 1336.20 Haven 1909 2001.83 791.45 1210.38 1910 1908 1909 2237.47 1105.16 1232.31 6574.90 3753.94 2820.96 Hotel 16712.74 15848.77 863.97 1910 12583.70 12570.74 2575.32 12.96 1908 7909 4118.02 1 542.70 Howland 2684.53 827.36 1857.17 1910 3063.64 1713.92 1176.77 333.89 272.37 1349.42 1908 1868.48 691.71 Jane Hope 1909 1098.65 764.76 1910 775.27 504.90 1908 1909 4906.46 4313.35 3850.12 1056.34 Massachusetts 3796.65 516.70? 1910 3526.50 3647.64 2346.92 2922.52 603.98 1908 3025.00 622.64 New York 1909 864.42 1482.50 1910 1908 3470.40 3005.42 1967.02 2259.94 1230.46 1774.10 1231.32 Pioneer 1909 1910 1908. 543.87 1421.15 1579.15 2744.66 1416.22 890.78 688.37 1159.43 1585.23 Rockefeller 1909 1910 666.33 249.89 1762.49 920.91 841.58 1908 1909 1910 1908 1909 3465.15 3136.96 328.19 Seidell 1567.43 881.41 2227.14 685.99 2700.59 1743.09 475.45 1084.12 1127.22 1592.02 658.97 George 1387.97 2068.80 160.75 1910 476,78 1908 32.37 1.84 30.53 Forbes 1909 40.51 40.51 1910 222.77 32.64