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Salient. An Organ of Student Opinion at Victoria College, Wellington, N.Z. Vol. 17, No. 7. April 29, 1953

Americans at Weir

Americans at Weir

Weir House is fortunate this year, as in former years. In having two American Fulbrlght students in residence. Both these young men are boisterous in their social Uvea and, consequently are worthy addition to the list of residents.

The bespectacled Larry Wagner is here doing research into the Social Security Act. 1938, but, like most of his countrymen, he in considering only the pecuniary side of the question, medical payments, in this instance. A former 8th. Dakota State College man, with a B.Sc. degree in journalism (what?), he was on the staff of the "American News." Aberdeen. 8th. Dakota, before he came to N.Z. On returning to the U.S.A., Mr. Wagner Intends to write a scries of articles for his paper on his impressions of life in this country. This probably explains the enthusiastic way he goes about his work; he seems the kind of man who likes to specialise and, at times during the day, can be found talking with the people themselves in the bar of the Royal Oak Hotel. Asked his opinion on N.Z. beer, Mr. Wagner made a characteristic, enlightening observation. "I like it." His plans for the future are uncertain as the armed forces require him for the next two years but he will definitely be continuing with his career in journalism when he is discharged.

Unofficially aiding Mr. Wagner in his comprehensive study of life in N.Z. Is Mr. Robert Kelson who is preparing his doctoral thesis which will be on some aspect of parliamentary relations. Before leaving U.S.A. Mr. Kelson was a Junior lecturer in political science at Boston University, having obtained his A.B. there In 1943 and his M.A. the following year. Ho has also had n year's experience in library work and if the university library is short of staff, perhaps, he could be persuaded to put in a few hours work each day to help relieve the situation instead of making a nuisance of himself at the opening of Parliament. Referring to the incident when ho was asked to remove himself from the hallowed precincts of specious oratory, Mr. Kelson made the following statement to 'Salient:" "After thoroughly investigating the legal aspect I am convinced that the official in question was guilty of misjudgment nnd that 1 was acting within my rights." He mentioned that he hail the support of a prominent member of Parliament to back up this statement. We did not disillusion the young man with the morbid details of the fate of other young men who had M.P. support.

In the course of his research. Mr. Kelson hopes to Interview many leading governmental and parliamentary officials. We wish him luck but it is commonly known that Ml. Everest is more accessible than these distinguished gentlemen. He will follow Mr. Wagner's example and write professional articles for a political magazine when he goes home to complete his doctorate and continue his pedagogic occupation. His comment on N.Z. Women—"friendly."

These two enterprising gentlemen are embarking on a seventeen-day tour of the South Island during the term holidays In May and Mr. Kelson would be very pleased to learn of some kind student who can spare a sleeping bag. If such a student exists, he can contact Mr. Kelson by ringing 45-012.