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Typo: A Monthly Newspaper and Literary Review, Volume 3

Inventions

Inventions.

A New Perforator.—The H. C. Hansen Pin-hole Perforating Machine (Boston) runs the sheet between two wheels, one fitted with pins, and justifying accurately into holes in the other wheel. In point of price, the machine seems to be about the same as those in ordinary use: its advantage is, that it will perforate any length.

A Use for Old Leather.—Old shoe-leather is worse than useless, it is troublesome. Except by fire, it is almost indestructible, and it is anything but good fuel, besides being unpleasantly odorous in the process of combustion. A benefactor to the human race has arisen in New York, who has discovered how to turn this waste product to profitable account. He steams it to a pulp, and converts it into the soft and beautiful ornamental leather so popular for artistic book-binding.

A New Composing Machine.—The American Lithographer and Printer illustrates and describes the Bisley & Lake machine, a new contrivance to dispense with the use of type in certain kinds of printing. To call it a composing machine is scarcely correct, as it is only a very elaborate specialized type-writer. Its work is not pleasing to the eye, but is good enough for rapid printing of law-work, such as briefs, &c., where limited editions of long documents are required in a few hours' time, and good work is not essential. The printing is done in litho ink on transfer-paper, from which copies are made by lithography. The machine differs from other type-writers in having a justifying attachment peculiar to itself. When a sufficient number of words to approximately fill a line is registered, they are automatically justified with perfect accuracy. (In this respect the machine is ahead of the compositor.) This would also seem to imply that the matter is printed in lines instead of letters; but how this is done on the type-writer principle is not explained. On the other hand, it is not easy to understand how a line printed letter by letter can be justified in advance. It will be noted that the new invention is one which, however ingenious it may be, and however well adapted for certain rough kinds of work, will not interfere greatly with the occupation of the skilled compositor.