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The New Zealand Railways Magazine, Volume 5, Issue 8 (February 1, 1931)

Constructing the Christchurch-Ferrymead Line

Constructing the Christchurch-Ferrymead Line.

Meantime the preparation of the track between Christchurch and Heathcote was undertaken, and in order to take advanttage of this work it was decided to lay
The Department's Car And Wagon Shops In The South Island. Two interior views at the Addington Railway Workshops (Christchurch) shewing (left) the car shop, and (right) a corner of the bogie shop.

The Department's Car And Wagon Shops In The South Island.
Two interior views at the Addington Railway Workshops (Christchurch) shewing (left) the car shop, and (right) a corner of the bogie shop.

a spur line to the Ferrymead landing and to construct there a wharf at which cargo (including railway material) from and to vessels on the river could be handled. This decision led to some difference of opinion between the Superintendent and the Provincial Treasurer regarding payment for constructing this spur. The Treasurer declined to pay on the Superintendent's warrant the cost of the land required, on the ground that the spur to Ferrymead was not authorised as part of the Lyttelton to Christchurch railway. The Treasurer resigned, and the cost of this portion of the railway was paid out of the Provincial revenue and not out of the Railway loan. There was also some difficulty in acquiring at a reasonable price the land for the Christchurch station, and the abandonment of the site originally proposed was considered, but after some delay the matter was eventually settled by arbitration. On 30th June, 1863, the line from Ferrymead to Christchurch was reported as all ready for platelaying. A quantity of rails had already arrived and the balance, sufficient for five miles was expected during the following month. The Ferrymead wharf was in a forward state, and the timber for the station buildings was being cut at the contractors’ steam mills in Pigeon Bay.

(To be continued.)