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The New Zealand Railways Magazine, Volume 5, Issue 6 (October 1, 1930)

Melbourne to Adelaide

Melbourne to Adelaide.

In the journey to Adelaide by the night Express, the outward line traverses for a time level country, showing the growth of the suburbs of Melbourne and the great factories in and around Sunshine, and after, through a long stretch of poor land strewn with reddish boulders. The first stop in the early morning is at Murray Bridge, where heavily laden river barges lie close to the station. Here, if I mistake not, a huge loco, of the South Australian services takes our train in charge for the remainder of the journey, which passes over the Mt. Lofty ranges before the city is reached.

During the night mysterious cries of “Hey, hey!” are heard as the Express rushes along, but the secret is revealed at daybreak. In the lonely country districts, miles from a centre, boys and permanent way men shout for papers to be thrown to them, so anxious are they to page 35 see the latest news of the great outside world.

The hill country is decidedly picturesque, and many flowers are seen on the cuttings or at the edge of the bush. At the summit one comes suddenly into suburban conditions, as seen in bitumen roads, trim fences and beautiful villas. Then, for the remaining seven or eight miles, are noticed delightful panoramic views across the city, and, finally, the train passes through the outlying park lands and suburbs into the palatial new station.

At the time of my visit this was the pride and showplace of the city. My impression was that utility and convenience were the objects primarily considered by the architect. Space prevents a full description of this fine building, but mention must be made of its roomy well-equipped dining hall, whose numerous small tables have seats for over 300 diners. Nearby, a quick lunch counter has small circular topped rests for customers.

In Service on the South Australian Railways. “Mountain” type of locomotive, 4–8–4, and tender. The following are the chief particulars of the locomotive: Cylinders, dia. 26in.; piston stroke, 28in.; wheels coupled, dia. 5ft, 3in.; grate area, 66 sq. ft.; boiler pressure, 200lbs. per sq. in.; tractive force at 85 per cent. of boiler pressure, 51,000lbs.; total heating surface, 3,609 sq. ft.; total weight in working order (engine and tender)., 218 tons 15cwt.; tender water capacity, 8,000 gals.; coal, 12 tons.

In Service on the South Australian Railways.
“Mountain” type of locomotive, 4–8–4, and tender. The following are the chief particulars of the locomotive: Cylinders, dia. 26in.; piston stroke, 28in.; wheels coupled, dia. 5ft, 3in.; grate area, 66 sq. ft.; boiler pressure, 200lbs. per sq. in.; tractive force at 85 per cent. of boiler pressure, 51,000lbs.; total heating surface, 3,609 sq. ft.; total weight in working order (engine and tender)., 218 tons 15cwt.; tender water capacity, 8,000 gals.; coal, 12 tons.

Ramps lead to the first floor and to the street and trams. A luxurious hall as a waiting room and containing an enquiry office is situated on the first floor, in which a balcony permits a view being obtained of the extensive lobby giving access to the platforms. On the top storey are numerous and convenient offices for the managing staff and clerical employees.

The elevation view from the street is massive and imposing, while the inside is finished in white plaster, relieved by solid dark-coloured pillars. As much day work was used in the construction, the total cost has not transpired, but it is said to have been approximately half a million sterling.