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The New Zealand Railways Magazine, Volume 5, Issue 6 (October 1, 1930)

Department's Action Vindicated

Department's Action Vindicated.

We felt that we could not allow the matter to rest at that point, and we were prepared to adopt the company's competitive standard, but we insisted that that competitive standard should operate throughout the whole field of the company's traffic, and not only over that portion which it suited them to send by our competitor. We therefore made a regulation which provided that all goods between the stations affected should be charged at the competitive page 31 rate. This, of course, covered the low-rated goods as well as the high-rated goods. So that those persons who gave us the whole of their business should not be penalised, we also made a regulation that in the case of those persons who gave us the whole of their business, the classified or local rates (whichever were the cheaper) should apply rather than the uniform rate. The company in question has resorted to various subterfuges of, in my opinion very doubtful ethical standard, in order to circumvent our purpose. On the other hand, we have had other companies who have been affected by the regulation I have mentioned and who have apparently seen the fairness of our action and have placed the whole of their traffic with us.

The company I have referred to above endeavoured to create a certain amount of agitation among the business community at the inception of our action, but they were quite unsuccessful in their effort to place us in a wrong light with the business community.

Railwaymen in the Making. (Rly. Publicity photo.) Mr. W. Styles, of the Department's Training School in Wellington, instructing railway cadets in the correct method of loading timber for transport.

Railwaymen in the Making.
(Rly. Publicity photo.)
Mr. W. Styles, of the Department's Training School in Wellington, instructing railway cadets in the correct method of loading timber for transport.