Other formats

    TEI XML file   ePub eBook file  

Connect

    mail icontwitter iconBlogspot iconrss icon

The New Zealand Railways Magazine, Volume 5, Issue 1 (May 1, 1930)

In Geyserland's Capital

In Geyserland's Capital.

Soon the train is on the levels, crossing now and again a trout stream twisting down from the hills between low banks clothed in manuka and flax bushes, and presently there comes a sniff of sulphuretted hydrogen as a clear brook is crossed, and there is a glimpse of steaming pools half-veiled in white vapour. That first whiff of the sulphurous regions abides in the memory. It is the first sign and token of a curious land, unpleasant to some on a first; acquaintance, yet hailed with a greeting after a year or two of absence. As one comes to know the Geyser Country he grows accustomed to the pungent odour of the sulphur springs, and perhaps to like it, as the natives do. Use makes one tolerant of many things once passing strange, and Rotorua is not the only famous place where the traveller receives his first impressions through the nose. However, even these insistent odours of Hot Spring Land have their uses. The sulphur breath that rises through a thousand crevices and solfataras in the fern or manuka scrub or in the lakeside gardens seems effectually to fumigate the place.

The Finest Train on the New Zealand Railways. (Rly Publicity Photo) The new Rotorua “Limited Express” on one of its trial runs.

The Finest Train on the New Zealand Railways.
(Rly Publicity Photo)
The new Rotorua “Limited Express” on one of its trial runs.

page 30