Other formats

    TEI XML file   ePub eBook file  

Connect

    mail icontwitter iconBlogspot iconrss icon

The New Zealand Railways Magazine, Volume 5, Issue 1 (May 1, 1930)

The Railway Nights

The Railway Nights.

There are several methods of reaching Rotorua, but the only real way is the railway. It you are unable to travel by “Daylight Limited” and follow the sun, you have the option of hitching your wagon to a star and making a night of it. The delights of the Arabian Nights have nothing on railway nights. Nights. Night, dear reader, is the time for travel. There is a time and place for everything: for travel, the night is the time, and the train is the place, for at night the mind is mellow and the soul is soothed; the liver is in lambent mood, and the hand of peace rests lightly and love the consciousness; the fonts of charity and love are uncorked, and harmony occupies the whole interior.

As the train bores a hole through the night your will observe the nocturnal modifications of humanity on the nocturnal modifications of humanity on the hoof. Meanwhile lights flash past your window—swift splashes of illumination hurled at you out of the night; a noble roar tells you that a bridge has been met and conquered; another roar like giants pounding muffled drums, tells you that the earth has flung open its gates to let the flying giant pass under; the brakes exert their powerful but gentle restraint, like the careful pressing of a gargantuan hand; a splash of light rushes to meet you, and stops; out of the night there comes a lonely cry, and you know that you are at a country station. Here a small boy with a large head and a tin trunk as big as a submarine boards the train as proudly as if he were mounting the carcase of a victim dragon. The honeymoon couple under the tartan rug stir, and rush out the eats again; the dear old lady who has been sleeping with her head on her life-mate's chest, like a fatigued cherub, stirs and fumbles for her somehow pathetic hat on her lap; the hearty old gentleman, the baby girl with the plump pink legs, the whole happy band of nocturnal migrants, are transported by the magic of the wheels whirring under the excellent rolling stock of the Railways to New Zealand's wonderful garden of geysers.

“The pioneer if the ray-wash movement.”

“The pioneer if the ray-wash movement.”

X-Cellent Rolling Stock On The Railway

X-Cellent Rolling Stock On The Railway

page 16
Inspection Of Hillside Workshops. At the invitation of the General Manager of Railways Mr. H. H. Sterling, over 100 members of the Dunedin Chamber of Commerce recently paid a visit of inspection to the Department's new workshops at Hillside, Dunedin. The visitors were accompanied by Mr. Sterling, Mr. E. T. Spidey (Superintendent of Workshops), Mr. C. Graham (Workshops Manager), Mr. G. Baird (General Foreman), and other members of the official staff at Hillside, who acted as guides and demonstrators. Commencing with the Steel Wagon Shop a thorough inspection was made of the entire works, the visitors being much impressed alike by their magnitude and modern equipment. Especially interesting to them was the fact that the principal raw materials in use at Hillside were of New Zealand production—the Otago Iron Rolling Mills at Green Island, supplying large quantities of rolled iron and steel, whilst Onakaka pig Iron was used exclusively for iron castings. After the inspection, the visitors were entertained by the Department at afternoon tea in the dining room of the Social Hall, in the course of which they were addressed by Mr. Sterling, who briefly outlined the policy of the Department in regard to the workshops generally. The illustrations shew: (1) The visitors outside the Workshops Manager's office; (2) inspecting shop layout work; (3) watching cold-flanging of boiler plates; and (4) the visitors at afternoon tea.

Inspection Of Hillside Workshops.
At the invitation of the General Manager of Railways Mr. H. H. Sterling, over 100 members of the Dunedin Chamber of Commerce recently paid a visit of inspection to the Department's new workshops at Hillside, Dunedin. The visitors were accompanied by Mr. Sterling, Mr. E. T. Spidey (Superintendent of Workshops), Mr. C. Graham (Workshops Manager), Mr. G. Baird (General Foreman), and other members of the official staff at Hillside, who acted as guides and demonstrators. Commencing with the Steel Wagon Shop a thorough inspection was made of the entire works, the visitors being much impressed alike by their magnitude and modern equipment. Especially interesting to them was the fact that the principal raw materials in use at Hillside were of New Zealand production—the Otago Iron Rolling Mills at Green Island, supplying large quantities of rolled iron and steel, whilst Onakaka pig Iron was used exclusively for iron castings. After the inspection, the visitors were entertained by the Department at afternoon tea in the dining room of the Social Hall, in the course of which they were addressed by Mr. Sterling, who briefly outlined the policy of the Department in regard to the workshops generally. The illustrations shew: (1) The visitors outside the Workshops Manager's office; (2) inspecting shop layout work; (3) watching cold-flanging of boiler plates; and (4) the visitors at afternoon tea.

page 17