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The New Zealand Railways Magazine, Volume 4, Issue 12 (April 1, 1930)

[section]

High up in the papa-walled gorge of the Wanganui River, the powerful stream came rolling and roaring down between its straight cliffs, kiekie-fringed and tree-feathered, in a tremendous yellow volume, twenty feet and more above its normal level. The great rains were on; the old hands of Pipiriki, white and Maori, remembered scarcely a wetter season. For nearly a week it had been pouring down steadily, and every tributary creek was a torrent, sending down a furious sluice to swell the main streams and make navigation a matter of difficulty along more than a hundred miles of waterway. Here, at Pipiriki, very nearly sixty miles from the sea, the landing jetty was under water, and the powerful little steamer that carried passengers and goods along this section of the Wanganui tied up well inside and high above her usual berth. The sight of the swollen river, plunging down through its deep valley, was sufficiently wild from the Pipiriki terrace; wilder still was its aspect at very close quarters next day when we set off up-stream through the canyon country to the Maori village of Parinui. Our steamboat was a shallow-draught screw craft specially designed for the hard work of mid-Wanganui navigation. A curious feature about her was the two big rudders she wore, wide apparently out of all proportion to her size; the pair were necessary in this navigation of rough waters.

A Beautiful Scenic Waterway. (Govt. Publicity photo.) The Houseboat on the Wanganui River, North Island, New Zealand.

A Beautiful Scenic Waterway.
(Govt. Publicity photo.)
The Houseboat on the Wanganui River, North Island, New Zealand.