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The New Zealand Railways Magazine, Volume 4, Issue 12 (April 1, 1930)

Conference and Death-Bed

Conference and Death-Bed.

Balfour did not live long enough to read the exaggerated praise passed upon him by the Hearst journals. While the 1930 Naval Reduction Conference (a sequel to 1922) was struggling in London with its problems, he lay awaiting death, conscious of its approach, and, happy in the enjoyment of the music of the piano played by friends—an instrument of which he was himself a master. He was slipping into dreamland, passing beyond the reach of that still unsolved conundrum of how an island off the coast of Europe can regard European Continental armaments with the detachment and comparative unconcern with which they may be regarded in a trans-Atlantic continent or in islands lying off the farther coast of Asia. Not his was the task to be the diplomatic link between America and Japan on the one hand, and France and Italy on the other; nor was it for him to discover how the disarmament spirit of the Western Powers could be lived up to without abandoning the Mediterranean to Gaul and Italian. To the dying man the suggestion that he sank the American Navy, and the allegation that Mr. Ramsay MacDonald is sinking the British Navy, would probably have seemed equally fantastic—the hyperbole of extremists. And perhaps we had better leave it at that.

An Historic Boxing Contest. (Photos by courtesy of the “N.Z. Free Lance” (centre), and Mr. L. Wallace) At the Wellington Speedway's Stadium on 29th March, 1930, in the presence of a concourse of people, estimated at 17,000, the popular New Zealand Railways Fireman, Tommy Donovan, of Waitara (centre), secured a meritorious points decision over Pete Sarron (U.S.A.), in one of the most thrilling contests ever staged in New Zealand. Donovan's aggressive tactics, which have established him firmly in the esteem of boxing enthusiasts, are shewn in the above illustrations, taken during the contest.

An Historic Boxing Contest.
(Photos by courtesy of the “N.Z. Free Lance” (centre), and Mr. L. Wallace)
At the Wellington Speedway's Stadium on 29th March, 1930, in the presence of a concourse of people, estimated at 17,000, the popular New Zealand Railways Fireman, Tommy Donovan, of Waitara (centre), secured a meritorious points decision over Pete Sarron (U.S.A.), in one of the most thrilling contests ever staged in New Zealand. Donovan's aggressive tactics, which have established him firmly in the esteem of boxing enthusiasts, are shewn in the above illustrations, taken during the contest.