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Samoan Material Culture

Figure 296.—Lashing pigeon net to handle:

Figure 296.—Lashing pigeon net to handle:

Figure 296.—Lashing pigeon net to handle:

a, the handle has four holes (1-4) bored through in the middle line, the lowest (4) being 2.75 inches from the bottom of the fork. Through these holes, two to three turns of sennit braid are passed and form transverse bands around the handle. The sides of the handle are grooved as far down as the lowest sennit band (4). The bands form loops over the side grooves to assist in keeping the rods of the frame (5) in position. Similar bands of sennit but with more turns are tied around the limbs of the forks (6 and 7). From the lashing at 7, the braid is left long to make the upper lashings around the ends of the limbs. The sennit braid (8) from the lashing (7) at the base of the prong is now carried up and wound three times around the upper end of the left prong (9). It is then carried across to the right prong and makes three more turns around its upper end (10). It is carried back to the left prong from the back (11) and after making three more turns around it, it passes across to the right prong to repeat the procedure. In making the lashings around the upper ends of the prongs, the frame rods are further secured to the handle. The cross turns between the prongs are made on either side front and back so as to provide a set of transverse turns crossing the notch between the prongs. b, Section through prongs of handle. The sennit braid (7) is now carried around the transverse turns at 11 and by drawing them together, tightens up the top lashings. When sufficiently taut the braid is tied at 12. The cross section shows the rods (5) resting against the groove on the outer side of the prongs (13).