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The Spike: or, Victoria College Review, 1939

People You Know

page 50

People You Know

Dick Wild, a recent President of the Students' Association, has been lecturing in law subjects for accountants' professional examinations, in the intervals of setting up practice on his own; while Bob Bradshaw, another recent President, has been lecturing in auditing and advanced bookkeeping, in the intervals of being Warden of Weir House.

* * * *

After a year spent teaching at a high school in Johannesburg, and a second year at London, where he studied at the Imperial Educational Institute, which is attached to London University, John Hatherly has returned with a Diploma of Education and an impeccable English accent.

* * * *

Recent graduates will be interested to hear that Max Riske has accepted a part-time position assisting Professor Gould with the education lectures, and helping particularly with the experimental work.

* * * *

For sixteen months the Philosophy Department is to be deprived of the services of Dr. Ernest Beaglehole, whose lectures on anthropology this year were extremely illuminating, interesting, amusing and—free. He has joined the staff of the School of Social Studies, San Francisco, where he will take part in a scheme of adult education which is being tried out there. The idea is to draw classes from the agricultural district of Santa Rosa, and to study through group reading the structure and the influences at work in our society. During the summer vacation Dr. Beaglehole plans to travel in the United States to various Universities and other research institutions, so as to keep in touch with the latest developments in psychology.

* * * *

The average age of the College Council has been lowered a little this year by the inclusion in its numbers of the first post-war graduate to be elected, W. P. Rollings. Mr. Rollings had a distinguished student career, being President of the Students' Association, and prominent in debating, in which he won the Plunket Medal and the Union Prize, and has since kept in touch with current affairs at the College to a certain extent. The desire for representation upon the Council among the younger graduates was clearly expressed in the energy with which they supported Mr. Rollings, and it is felt that he will be a very sound and capable member.

To this same Council, by the way, R. S. V. Simpson has been elected as the first student representative.

* * * *

There is some uncertainty as to the movements of the various professors, lecturers and scholarship-holders at present scattered through Europe and America. Professor Gordon, whose wife had preceded him to Scotland, while he waited in New York to attend a conference of English professors, was originally to leave Montreal early in September to rejoin her. But, though the rumour that she had sailed on the Athenia proved to be unfounded, he was apparently having no little difficulty in crossing.

Dr. and Mrs. Keys were likewise last heard of in America, where they were held up on their way to France.

As for the scholarship people, it seemed a sad thing that when at last Victoria managed to flaunt a Rhodes Scholar, Ian Berendsen should get no further than Panama before he was recalled, since the Rhodes trustees had decided to cancel all awards. Returning with him came Ron Meek, who had been awarded a Strathcona Research Studentship for two years at Cambridge. Still, it was a pleasant sea voyage.

page 51

R. R. Cunningham, who, with Eric MacCormick, was for some time this year lecturing in English, sailed recently for Europe on a post-graduate scholarship and when last heard of was in Kenya.

* * * *

A large circle of friends heard from Jack Aimers as he moved rapidly about the map of Australia in company with Michael O'Callaghan of Otago in the recent University debating tour. His very simple and efficient system of carboning his letters and then directing that each copy be forwarded to a defined list of readers demonstrated the superiority of the legal mind. The two speakers debated at most of the leading Universities of Victoria, New South Wales and Queensland, and visited Tasmania, and spoke over an impressive list of wireless stations. Australians generally were interested most of all in the Labour Party's policy and its general effect upon the country, and enquired about it at every opportunity. The rate of travel and the hospitality were terrific, but the pair returned full of enthusiasm, well tanned, Mr. Aimers being equipped with various little photos and pamphlets giving views of Students' Union buildings.