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The Pamphlet Collection of Sir Robert Stout: Volume 84

Maritana

Maritana.

Act I. Scene. I.—A Square in Madrid.

Opening Chorus.
Sing pretty maiden, sing that lovely song again;
Sing pretty maiden, sing; the thrilling airs of Spain :
Sing of love and beauty, bower and tented plain—
Sing, sweet Maritana, sing that song again !
Sing, sing Gitana !

Romanaza—Maritana.
It was a knight of princely mien, one blue and golden day
Came riding through the forest green, that round his castle lay,
And there he heard a gipsy maid, her song of love reveal;
Like a spirit of light,
She enchanted the knight.
'Twas a king !

Cho

'Twas a king !

Mar

' I'was a King of Castile !

Cho

Sing, sing Maritana,

No delay, no delay,
Love's minstrel Maritana,
He will play, thus we pay.

(Giving her money.)


Mar

Her beauty's blaze, her magic tone,

His lost heart fled in vain;
And soon he raised her to a throne
O'er fair Castile to reign.
And so it chanced, a gipsy maid,
As legends old reveal,
From enchanting the throng
With one beautiful song,
Was a queen ?

Cho

Was a queen !

Mar

Yes the queen of Castile.

Cho

So, of old then, it befell,

Just as you the story tell ?
Brava, Brava, Maritana
It befell.
Then, as you tell, &c.

King

How beautiful she is ?

Enter Don Jose.

Don J

He. It is the third time I have discovered him on this spot.

Mar

Good signor, havn't you a single maravedi at the bottom of your purse ? it might better requite a poor singer than those forlorn looks. A quadruple of gold I can scarcely believe I am not dreaming again.

Don J

You have received a good offering this morning, eh, my little syren?
page 2

Mar

Yes, a golden quadruple. He must be some very rich man.

Don J

Very; Don Rafael d'Arpinas, the most opulent gentleman in Spain. (Aside) Your Majesty's secret is worth possessing. I shall improve my acpuaintance with this handsome Gitana; her star is in the ascendant. So my little mountain fairy, what song will you sing me for the fellow to that golden piece, which glitters still in that pretty hand ?

Mar

Anything, signor. What shall it be ?

Don J

Let me recollect ! Ah, the song you sang to the queen yesterday. Her majesty stopped her carriage to listen to you I believe.

Mar

It is no more than truth, signor.

Don

J It must have been a very interesting ditty.

Mar

A mere romance, popular in Madrid, said to have been heard in the palace of the old Moorish king far over the hills yonder. They call it the "Harp in the Air."

Don J

By all means sing it.

Mar

Willingly, signor, but first, I must summon my attendant spirits.

Song.
"The Harp in the Air."
I hear it again, 'tis the harp
'Tis the harp in the air,
It hangs on the walls of the old Moorish halls,
It hangs on the walls of the old Moorish halls.
tho' none know its minstrel, or how it came there,
Listen, listen, there, there, 'tis the harp in the air,
'Tis the harp, 'tis the harp in the air.
Which telleth of days that are faded and gone,
It telleth of the brave, of the lovely and fair,
Of warriors grave and of maidens fair.
There, there, there, there,
List, Pilgrim list, 'tis the harp in the air.
Etc., etc., etc.

Don J

Bravo ! Take the recompense thy sweet song so richly deserves.

Mar

Another golden quadruple. See friends, I shall be affluent indeed. Oh, thanks signor. (Chimes heard.) Ah, the Angales. Such good fortune should admonish us to be doubly devout.

Angelus.
Angels, that around us hover,
Guard us until the close of day;
Our heads, oh, let your white wings cover,
See us kneel, and hear us pray;
Angels that above us hover,
Guard us through another day.

Don J

Why do you sigh in contemplating your gains ?

Mar

Because they are still too little, or too much, signor.

Don J

What mean you ?
page 3

Mar

Too much for remunerating songs of a poor Gitana and too little to confirm the dreams of splendour which nightly occupy my slumbers.

Don J

Ah, a Gitana, then, has her dreams of greatness.

Mar

Yes, I fancy myself in a golden coach, glittering with jewels. Oh, I despair of such visionary promises ever coming to pass. I—feathers—diamonds, Ha, ha, ha !

Duett—Maritana and Don Jose.

Mar

Of fairy wand had I the power
Some palace bright my home should be
By marble fount in orange bower,
Dancing to music's melody.

Don J

Those lovely eyes, those ruby lips,

Might win a brighter home for thee,
Than crystal hall, where fairy trips,
Lightly to echo's minstrelsy,

Mar

Of fairy wand, had I command,

At moonlit hour in silken bower,
To music's note, on air I'd float
In golden sheen and jewels gay.
Of pleasure, queen—I'd laugh and sing
And dance and play.

Don J

Those sparkling eyes are brighter prized,

Than gems that glow on knightly brow,
Of those avail, ere yet they fade,
For joy will quail, when times o'ershade
Then laugh while love and beauty aid.

Mar

He thinks, as others oft have done,

My wild fantastic thoughts are vain;
Are visions all, now here, now gone,
Like dreams that rise and fade again.

Don J

Thus woman's heart is ever bought,

If gold but gleam within her eyes,
So by the flame, the moth is caught,
Burneth its giddy wings, and dies.

Recitative—Don Jose.
Think of the splendour—the glory—
The bright career which waiteth the future, stops,
One round of triumph.

Ensemble.

Mar

Of fairy wand, &c.

Don J

Those sparkling eyes, &c.

The little vain coquette.

Mar

You laugh at my folly, signor?

Don J

Not in the least : what better to command wealth than such a passport of beauty ?

Mar

Ah, signor, now indeed, I know you are jesting with me. Listen ! There's the Queen passing through the grand square, if I could only attract her notice again ! Adieu, Signor, ambitious as I am, I can still remember to be grateful.

Exit

page 4

Don J

Au revoir, la belle Maritana! Yes, yes your aspiring dreams will come to pass, since, through your influence over the heart of the King, Don Jose looks to realise his own over that of the neglected Queen. Once persuaded of her husband's infidelity, might not the incensed wife be induced to look even from her throne for an object worthy of assisting her just revenge? then, Don Jose-yes, yes, Maritana, your dreams will come to pass, and speedily ! Ah, whom have we here?

Enter Don Cæsar.

Don C

Miserable knaves ! why they cheat at cards without conscience, as if they were privileged, like us nobles of Madrid. Oh, if it were no dishonour to my sword to chastise such canille ! Robbed, plundered of My last maravedi! I shall sup upon cold air to-night, and sleep—where I shill have the whole blue expanse above for a canopy ! Ha, ha, ha!

Don J

Am I mistaken ? no, it is Don Caesar de Bazan.

Don C

Don Jose de Santarem ?

Don J

The same. It is long since we met, Don Cæsar; you have been some time absent from Madrid.

Don C

On my travels.

Don J

They say travel changes a man—

Don C

And his apparel ! Ha, ha, ha !

Don J

Your noble father left you a high name, and a brilliant inheritance.

Don C

The name I still bear; the inheritance benefits mankind.

Don J

You had numerous followers ?

Don C

So I have still—creditors! Go wherever I will, they are to follow me; and as I am very fond of change by my valour, but I give them some trouble, ha, ha, ha !

Song.
"All the World Over."
All the world over, all the world over,
To love, to drink, to fight, I delight,
All the world over I delight,
To love, to drink, to fight, I delight.
Drink with the father, woo with the daughter,
Woo with the daughter, fight with the lover,
Wing'd like the swallow where spring flowers invite
Wing'd like the swallow where spring flowers invite,
By changing the scene all, all is serene,
By changing the scene all, all is serene,
And skies calmly blue bright, bright as the dew,
And skies calmly blue for me, for me, ever shine,
And skies ever blue for me, ever shine,
For me ever shine.
I'm always resigned wherever I find,
War, beauty or wine, war, beauty or wine.
Etc., etc., etc.

page 5

Don J

And what happy event has restored you to your native city?

Don C

The sweet but delusive hope that my creditors were all dead. Alas, creditors never die. But tell me, what news here ? Drink they the same, and fight as many duels as formerly ?

Don J

Duels have become rare in Madrid since the edict of the King.

Don C

What edict?

Don J

One which decrees that all who fight with the sword shall be shot; except the duel take place during the Holy-week, then the survivor is condemned to be—

Don C

What?

Don J

Hanged.

Don C

Um! If I mistake not, Holy-week commenced to-day.

Don J

Exactly so.

Don C

Then I must keep out of a passion. Hanged ! I shouldn't survive the disgrace. Ha. ha, ha ! What is all this?

Enter Lazarillo and Boatman.

Boa

Foolish boy, I insist on conducting you to your friends.

Laz

Why did you prevent me drowning myself? I wish to die.

Don C

Die at your age? Drown yourself? You cannot have many creditor's, surely.

Laz

No, signor, but I am apprenticed to a stern master—an armourer—who, under pretence that the corslets were not kept bright, beat me again to-day.

Don C

Again! Hath he beaten thee ere now ?

Laz

Yes, signor, frequently; till I cannot longer endure it. I prefer death. Ah, they come to arrest me.

Don C

Fear nothing. I'll interpose.

Laz

Alas ! that captain will not hear of pity.

Don C

I shall defend you with my sword

Don J

Recollect ! Holy-week.

Enter Captain and Soldiers.

Cap

See the culprit, quick, arrest him,

Don C

Stay, one word, ere you molest him.

Noble captain, brave sir, hear me,
Slay thy rage or learn to fear me.

Cap

Why my orders disobey you ?

Laz

Mercy, Mercy.

Don C

List, I pray you—
If a mere child's poor entreaty,
Fail to move that heart of thine;
If his voice excite not pity
Brother soldier, list to mine.

Cap

Come, your duty quickly seek,

Prayers and tears won't make me civil.

Don C

Oh, if 'i were not Holy-week,

Him I'd soon send to the devil.
Gallant captain,
page 6

Cap

Loose my cloak.

Don C

O Rage consumes me, I shall choke;

Laz

Mercy.

Cap

Come, your duty seek,

Don C

Oh, if 't were not Holy-week,

Cap

Quick, if you'd escape the lash,

Laz

Stay, this cruel anger stay,

Pity and forgiveness pray;
Ne'er again will I be rash,
Pity and withhold the lash.

Don C

Know sir, who I am;

Count de Garofa,
Don Cæsar de Bezan,
Who in the presence of his monarch,
Covered, has a right to appear,
You have insulted me beyond all bearing
Redress I seek.
Hence to the devil with the holy week,
Thus I chastise thy daring,

Cap

A challenge, vengeance.

Don C

A challenge, forward.

Ensemble.
Oh, you soon shall bite the dust,
Honour's debt is quickly staid;
Oh that by cut and thrust,
Dunning creditors were paid.

Cap

Come, you will not prove the first
Braggart whom this blade hath staid,
Only with a single thrust,
Your account is quickly paid.

Laz

Oh forbear, indeed you must,

Be this frightful quarrel staid,
If for me your life were lost,
Evermore would grief upbraid.

Don J

Evermore would grief upbraid,

Holy-week would dare invade,
Be this quarrel e'er so just,
By the halter will be paid.

Cho

See this combat, all now must,

Blow for blow and blade to blade,
Happy the man who falls the first,
Conquest by the hangman paid.

Don J

Have a care, my worthy captain; Don Cæsar is a dead thrust. 1 would not give a single maravedi for your share of daylight to-morrow.

Enter Maritana.

Mar

You here still, signor? Ah, I have seen our beautiful Queen looking so amiable, diamonds too, glittering brilliantly. Delightful.

Don J

This Gitana, who knows?—that fool, Don Cæsar too.—They might be rendered subservient to my purpose. Still dreaming of greatness, eh ?
page 7

Mar

Ah, signor, if I had but your opportunity of going to court and seeing all the splendour—why, you might speak to the King.

Don J

I prefer speaking to you.

Mar

Me. The time is badly chosen just now, for here are numbers of people who will require of me to tell their fortunes. Shall I tell yours, signor?

Don J

By-and-by, anon you shall learn your own.

Enter People.

Cho

Pretty Gitana, tell us
What the Kates decree ?
Pretty Gitana, tell us,
Shall we happy be ?
Shall I married be?
Shall I wealthy be ?

Mar

Yes, yes the language of the skies,

With ease can I impart;
But plainer read in starry eyes
The language of the heart.
With whom begins the charms ?

Cho

With me.

With me.

Mar

Young soldier, first your palm

Let me see ?

Sol

Willingly.

Mar

You love a pretty dame.

Sol

That's true.

Mar

You are to blame.

Beware of wooing an old man's wife;
Her youth and beauty will cause you strife.

(Soldier turns away confused.)

Cho

Beware of wooing.
Ha, ha, ha !

Mar

Good father, now your palm.

Old M

Cheerfully.

Mar

You have a handsome bride.

Old M

That's true.

Mar

Of beauty she's the pride,

When weak old dotards, to young maids Wed,
Young men do, sometimes, make love instead.

Old M

Bah !

Cho

When weak old dotards, etc.

Don J

In turn, what say you :

Shall I tell your fortune?

Mar

With all my heart.

Don J

Attend, I pray you;

It is, indeed, your fortune
I now impart.
To you I promise rank,—a carriage—
A splendid equipage,—a speedy marriage.

Mar

Marriage.

Oh, joy ! all, all my heart's desire,
Gladly I hear the star's decree;
page 8 Only I fear this sunny hope
Is far too bright, too bright for me.

Don J & Mar

And more than that, within thy hand

Don J & Mar

And more than that, within my hand

Almost a sceptre, high command,
A princely heart, a palace home,
The mirrored hall, the glittering dome.

Finale.
Enter Don Cæsar and Lazarillo.

Don C

Farewell, my gallant captain,
I told you how it would be;
You'll not forget, brave captain,
The lesson due to me,
Ha, ha, ha, ha,
Ha, ha, ha, ha,
I told you how 't would be.

Laz

The Alcade and the soldiers,

You they seek, I fear.

Don C

Then I another journey

Must take, that's pretty clear.

Ensemble.

Alc

Stay, in the name of the king,
I you arrest, sir, stay;
Your sword at once resign,
And now the laws obey.

Don J

Sir, the laws obey,

Your sword at once resign,

Don C

Well, in the name of the king.

Since you arrest, I stay !
My sword I thus resign,
And now the laws obey.
Why, in the name of the king,
A noble count thus stay;
We Don Cæsar defend,
If he the word but say.

Mar

Midst this tumult and strife,

Scarce half awake I seem :
The words that you have said
Still paint the pleasing dream.

Don J

Yes, by the name of the king,

Swear I, the sunny dream
Whene'er thou wak'st again
Shall on thee brightly beam.

Don C [to people)

Desist, I pray.

Alc

The laws obey.

Don C

Yes, I obey.

Alc

Away.

Peo

Stay, stay.

Don C

No, I obey. Away.

Mar

To-morrow I shall be a duchess.

Don C

To-morrow I no doubt will swing.

page 9

Don J

Yes too certain that your fate is.

Alc

March by order of the King.

Mar

Ah, what here do I behold?

Free the gallant captive pray,
I to-morrow shall have the gold,
Gladly I'll the ransom pay.

Don C

Generous creature, they'll not hear you.

Mar

I'll with gold to-morrow pay;

Don C

All good angels hover near you;

Alc

Cease this folly—on, away.

Maritana, Lazarillo and Chorus.
Oh, misfortune, for the quarrel
Must his life ignobly pay ?

Don J

I forewarned him, for this quarrel
He with life must surely pay.

Don C

All must die of something some day

'Tis a debt we all must pay.

Alc

Away, cease this folly and away,

He with life must surely pay.

Cho

Stay, stay.

Don C

No, I obey. Away, &c.

Act II.—Scene I.—Interior of a Fortress. Don Cæsar asleep on a settle, Lazarillo near him.

Aria—Lazarillo.

Laz

Alas ! those chimes, so sweetly pealing,
Gently dulcet to the ear,
Sound like Pity's voice revealing
To the dying, "Death is near."
Still he slumbers-how serenely,
Not a sigh disturbs his rest,
Oh, that angels now might waft him
To the mansions of the blest.

Yes, yes, those chimes, so softly dwelling,
As from some holy sphere,
Sounds like hymns of spirits telling
To the dying, " Peace is here."
Come abide with us in heaven,
Here no grief can reach thy breast,
Come, approaching angels wait thee
In the mansions of the blest.

Don C (Waking)

Ha, thou boy, tell me what o'clock is't?

(Lazarillo troubled, points to clock.)

Still two hours to live. Deuce, what made me wake so early ? Dreaming too, my creditors were all transported to the moon. Ha, ha, still two hours ! Boy, how shall I pass the time ?

Laz

Signor ?

Don C

If but two hours of life were thy whole remain of grief or joy in this world—answer me truly, scapegrace, how would'st employ thyself, eh ?
page 10

Laz

Pardon, signor, I would send for a priest and confess my sins

Don C

Ha, ha. What, confess my sins in two hours?

Two hours might serve thee boy, but for me two years would scarce suffice. Well thought, I'll make my will—no, that would scarce occupy two minutes.

Laz

Alas, and is there no one, signor, might supplicate the King to spare thy life ?

Don C

No, P0, boy, no one cares whether I'm shot or hanged.

Laz

No one ?

Don C

No one; yes—one—

Laz

Oh, name him.

Aria—Don Cæsar.

Don C

Hither as I came, one poor old man,
With silver hairs, and tear drops in his eyes,
Wept that my life was wasted to a span
And mercy importun'd with bitter cries.

Laz

Thy father?

Don C

Frantic were his looks, that poor old man !

Lost in despair before the guard he ran,
And held a document, at least, so long—

Laz

His sad petition, thee to guard from ill?

Don C

It was, alas! an unpaid tailor's bill,

Ha, ha, ha, this one eternal dun,
Torments of earth, I shall at least out-run.

Trio.

Don C

Turn on, old Time, thine hour-glass,
The sand of life why stay ?
Quick let the gold-grain'd moments pass
'Tis they all debts must pay.
Of what avail are grief and tears,
Since life which came must go ?
And brief the longest tide of years,
As waves that ebb and flow.

Laz

Nor let the golden moments pass

Like worthless sand away,
For him, oh, be there many years,
Apart from ev'ry woe.

Don J

Despite old Time, thine hour-glass

Turn quickly as it may,
His sand of life shall not yet pass,
If he my wish obey.

Don C

Don Jose in my prison.

Don J

Ought that to surprise you? Am I not an old friend? As first minister I would exert my influence to serve you.

Don J

Have you no last request ?

Don C

Um, none. Yes, yonder boy, who just quitted us; I somehow take an interest in his fate.

Don J

Is he not the cause of your death ?

Don C

Inadvertently. I owe him that—but, then I owe something to everybody.
page 11

Don J

You wish me to take the lad into my service ?

Don C

That is my wish.

Don J

It shall be done; what more ?

Don C

Nothing.

Don J

No, is he the last of the Garofas then content to perish like—

Don C

Hush, I fear to think of such ignominy. If his Majesty would but confer upon me the happiness of falling like a soldier.

Cavatina.

Don C

Yes, let me like a soldier fall
Upon some open plain,
This breast expanded for the ball,
To blot out every stain,
Brave, manly hearts, confer my doom,
That gentler ones may tell :
Howe'er forgot, unknown my tomb—
I, like a soldier, fell.

I only ask of that proud race,
Which ends its blaze in me;
To die, the last, and not disgrace
Its ancient chivalry.
Tho' o'er my clay no banner wave,
Or trumpet requiem swell;
Enough—they murmur at my grave—
He, like a soldier, fell.

Don J

I pledge my honour to see this performed, on condition

Don C

Condition to me ! what is it ?

Don J

You must marry—

Don C

Marry, I, what, for an hour and three-quarters ? You are jesting.

Don J

No, quite the contrary.

Don C

Ah, then, I see, it's my name you require ?

Don J

Perhaps—

Don C

To elevate some antique maiden, who sighs to become a countess—fifty years of age, no doubt.

Don J

It is immaterial to you.

Don C

And ugly as a Gorgon, eh ?

Don J

You will never behold her.

Don C

How am I to marry a woman I never saw ?

Don J

Her features will be rendered invisible to you by a thick veil, which will also prevent her seeing you; but you must give your honour not even to demand her name. Will you consent to take her for thy wedded wife ?

Don C

I will. Mind, on condition, that I am to be shot instead of hanged.

Don J

Agreed.

Don C

And that I see and carouse with the brave fellows commissioned to despatch me.

Don J

Strange request, however, be it so; a banquet shall be page 12 served and your guards attend; and, as your costume is somewhat unbridegroom-like, you'll find apparel more suiting the occasion in yonder chamber. Please you put it on.

Don C

Oh, by all means. Attention to costume is necessary when one becomes a bridegroom.

Don J

Yes, yes, la belle Maritana, my prediction of thy advancement cometh quickly to pass—married to Don Cæsar, the widow'd Countess of Garofa may approach so near the King, as to be ever fascinating in his eyes and heart—but, will Maritana consent to this blindfold marriage? I'll tell her 'tis the Queen's command.

Enter Lazarillo.

Don J

For me. Um! the King's pardon for Don Caesar; it will not suit the first minister's policy that this should arrive at present. Boy, at the request of Don Cæsar, I admit you at once into my service.

Laz

Thanks, signor, to-morrow?

Don J

Why not to-day ?

Laz

To-day he lives who dies, alas, for me. I cannot forsake him till to-morrow, signor, I shall be as devoted to your service as I am to his.

Don J

As thou pleasest. Go tell them at the hotel, yonder, in my name to serve a banquet, for at least twenty, and say to the Captain of the Guard, I would speak to him.

Don J

It is a desperate game I am playing, but the very thought of possessing the Queen brings memory back to the happy time when first I beheld and loved her.

Song.

"In Happy Moments."

Words copyrighted.

Enter Lazarillo.

Laz

How strange, a sumptuous banquet to be given. This must be some mistake—some—

Enter Don Cæsar.

Laz

I'm not awake,

Don C

Ah, boy—why, how you stare? Saw'st thou never a nobleman in velvet and gold before ? Ah, here come our guests and the banquet. Bravo, Don Jose.

Welcome friends—welcome to the table—all quickly.

Laz

Am I dreaming?

Enter Soldiers, then Servants.

Laz

Alas, whom see I ? Signor, 'tis the Alcade.

Don C

He's welcome, bid him enter.

Enter Alcade and Officers.

Alc

Don Cæsar de Bazan?

Don C

I sir, am he.
page 13

Alc

Your sentence is now changed. 'Tis the decree of the King you be shot; there, 'neath the fortress wall. You, sir, see it done at seven o'clock; the warrant so commands.

Don C

So; are they gone ? That affair is settled. Let us to our cups. Six by the clock; fill up and sing, no time to rehearse.

Enter Don Jose and Maritana.

Don C

Fill—Long life and a happy widowhood to my future Countess.

Solo Don CæSar.
Health to the lady, the lovely bride,
Length of years to her be given;
Like this brightly sparkling nectar.
Radiant with the light of heaven.

Cho

Health to the lady, the lovely bride.

Laz

Life on her each bliss bestow,

Like this cup of rosy nectar,
May her hours with joy o'erflow.

Don C

By this hand so soft and trembling,
By those looks so sunny bright;
'Neath that cruel veil dissembling,
Youth and beauty hide their light.

Mar

Like the mist upon the mountain,
So this veil obscures my sight,
From this bosom palpitation,
Closing every beam of light.

Don J

Hark, the organ, sweetly pealing,
Calleth to the nuptial rite;
Time is flying; quick, be stirring,
You must wed and die to-night.

Don C & Mar

Lo, the organ, sweetly pealing,
Calleth to the hallowed rite.
Ah, what mystery—no escaping—

Don C

I must wed and die to-night.

Mar

I must be a bride to-night.

Laz

Yes, the organ, hope inspiring,
Calleth to the nuptial rite;
Like a spirit seems to murmur—
No; he shall not die to-night.

Cho

Hark, the organ softly pealing,
Calleth to the nuptial rite;
Ah, what hear we—task revolting,
He by us must fall to-night.

Scene 2,—Saloon in the Palace of Marquis Montefiore.

Cho

Ah, what pleasure, the soft guitar,
And merry, merry castinet,
Beguile the hours,
page 14 While balmy flowers
And sparkling wine,
With eyes that shine
Like wandering stars together met,
Chase from the heart all sad regret.
Let true delight each bosom cheer
Since not a care can enter here.

Marchioness advances.

Marc

Holy Madelina, what sound was that? My nerves are absolutely aspen leaves.

Marq

Sweet, my lady marchioness; subdue this terrific sensibility; yonder sound, fair excellence, was a—mere nothing; some ruffianly soldier, for drawing his sword in holy week condemned (as one of my rascals informed me) to be shot at seven o'clock.

Marc

Dear me, Marquis, was that all? What a noise they make about trifles. Pray, continue the dance.

Marq

Amiable creature.

Enter Don Jose.

Don J

Marquis.

Marq

I'm enchanted to behold—

Don J

Suppress these raptures, Monsieur le Marquis, and listen to me. I have conducted hither your niece, whom you lost some ten years ago.

Marq

My niece? Impossible. I have no niece, signor.

Don J

Oh, yes, you have : when I gave you the appointment of Grand Director of the Royal Menagerie, you promised to recollect whatever I wished. Stretch you memory a little, Monsieur le Marquis; I say you have a long lost niece.

Marq

Oh, certainly, Don Jose. Now you remind me, I recollect my pretty little niece well enough. Where is the dear little infant ?

Don J

Infant ! um. During ten years' absence she is wonderfully grown up, of course.

Marq

Certainly, she must be in such a lapse of time. Where is she? I'm impatient. Is she handsome, like the family ? Does she resemble me ?

Don J

Judge for yourself; here she is. Madame la Countess de Bazan. Madame—Monsieur le Marquis de Montefiore, your noble uncle.

Mar

A marquis, my—

Marq

But I thought Don Cæsar de Bazan, at seven o'clock this evening, was expected to—

Don J

Join the present parly, of course; and this way I perceive he approacheth. You will apprise the Marchioness, your wife, of the return of her lovely relative. I'll instantly and—

Enter The King.

Don J

The Countess.

King

Charming Maritana, my beauteous bride.

Mar

Bride.
page 15

King

Oh, yes, mine; I could not live without thee. It seemeth to me, beautiful Maritana, as if love's bright genius had but created thy sweet presence to render this world an earthly paradise.

Enter Don Jose.

Song.
"Hear Me, Gentle Maritana."
Hear me, gentle Maritana,
By the magic of thy beauty;
Hear me sweu-too, fair Gitana
This fond heart beats but for thee.
Captive 'neath thy chains delighted
Tho' its doom be dark and heavy,
By a smile of thine delighted,
Would not if it could be free.
By a smile of thine delighted
Would not if it could be free.

The mariner in his barque
When o'er him dim clouds hover,
With rapture thro' tempest dark
Beholds one star above.
Sweet hope then his bosom swells,
His every care seems over,
Sweet hope then his bosom swells,
His every care seems over.
A smile as from heaven tells
Of home delight and love.
A smile as from heaven tells
Of home delight and love.

Don J

Sire, the guests return to the saloon—withdraw, I beseech, or recognise—

King

And Maritana?

Don J

At the appointed hour, you'll find her at the Villa d'Aranguez—Sire, they come.

King

I depart, remember.

Mar

Gone; am I fiee?

Don J

Yes, till midnight. Go, join in the festivity, and anticipate every happiness; they come to invite you.

Enter Marquis.

Marq

Sweet niece, shall we electrify them with a saraband ?

Mar

Dance ? willingly ! The departure of yon dark stranger has removed a cloud from my heart; and a secret monitor whispers me that a much dearer object is not far distant whose presence will quickly confirm every anticipated joy.

Don J

She little dreams that other is no more.

Enter Don Cæsar.

Don C

Don Jose

Don J

That voice! Who art thou ?

Don C

Don Cæsar, at your service.
page 16

Don J

Alive!

Don C

Yes; some benevolent fairy, I presume, withdrew the bullets from the arquebuses. Not liking to disgrace, I won't say disappoint my executioners, I fell, pretended to be shot ? they walked away—I walked hither.

Don J

For what purpose?

Don C

To claim my wife?

Don J

Your wife; who told you she was here ?

Don C

The same good fairy that withdrew the bullets from the arquebuses. Where is she ?

Don J

In that room—find her out yourself.

Don C

I will. Oh, I should know her from a thousand, if only from a touch of her small while hand.

Don J

How to mislead him?

Enter Marquis.

Don J

Ah, this creature—where's your wife?

Marq

Receiving the adulations of her adoring guests, as her lovely white hand touches the trembling lute. O—h !

Don J

Ah, I have an appointment ill my gift, Grand Master of the Aviary. Instruct the Marchioness to play a part as I direct, the appointment is yours.

Marq

I, Grand Master of the Royal Aviary, with a pension of——. What part is the divine Marchioness to play, Don Jose? Is it on the lute? She'll suspend your every faculty with a single chord.

Don J

Bah, lute, no, no, I'll tell you,—this way.

Re-enter Don Cæsar.

Don C

No wife there. Like some phantom, still at every turn she eludes my approach; such is the promised but fading happiness of the profligate, when nothing remains to him but the sad memory of the past.

Cavatina—don Cæsar.
There is a flower that bloometh,
When autumn leaves are shed.
With the silent moon it weepeth,
The spring and summer fled.
The early frost of winter
Scarce one tint hath overcast,
Oh, pluck it ere it wither,
'Tis the memory of the past,
It wafted perfume o'er us,
Of sweet, though sad regret;
For the true friends gone before us,
Whom none would e'er forget.
Let no heart brave its power,
By guilty thoughts o'ereast;
For then a poison flower,
Is—the memory of the past.

Re-enter Don Jose, Marchioness, and Marquis.

Don J

The Countess de Bazan.
page 17

Don C

Ecstasy. 'Tis ber hand.

Marq

Eh ! My wife, Countess de Bezan. And that the man whom they shot this very morning. I'm petrified; I'll alarm all the—

Don J

Silence; remember the appointment.

Marq

I can scarcely restrain my rage.

Don C

Don't be indignant on my account, good marquis.

Marq

If you don't admire her yourself, don't attempt to dishearten others.

Don J

Then you renounce a bride who has married you for your name alone ?

Don C

Can you ask it ?

Don J

Don't be too hasty; be advised by a friend. Your wife is rich I Sign a contract to relinquish her, and quit Madrid for ever. I'll insure you an annual remittance of five thousand piastres.

Don C

Pen, ink, and paper; 'tis done.

Don J

They are here; write.

Don C

You have only to dictate.

Don J

Write, I, Don Cæsar, Count de Garofa, consent to quit the Countess, my wife, and Madrid, for ever, on payment of—

(Maritana sings in the saloon. Don Cæsar pauses to listen.)

Don C

Eh' What's that ?

Don J

Write; write.

Maritana sings within.
I hear it again; 'tis the harp in the air;
It hangs on the walls of the old Moorish halls :
Tho' none know its minstrel or how it came there,
Listen ! 'Tis the harp in the air.
It telleth of tales that are faded and gone;
It telleth of the brave, of the lovely and fair; —
Of a warrior's grave, and a maiden's despair.
List, pilgrim, list 'tis the harp in the air.

Don C

That voice, that voice,
'Tis her's, I swear
With whom I at the altar knelt.

Don J

Cæsar, Cæsar,

Beware, Beware,
Ere all thy danger yet be felt.

Don C

I'll seek my wife

Don J

'Twill cost thy life.

Enter Officers and Soldiers.

Don J

Lo, a criminal before you,
Fled from justice, guard with life.

Don C

But an instant, I implore you,

Just to know who is my wife.

Don J

No, no, no

It must not be

Don C

Her let me see.

Don J

Away, away.

Don C

Stay, stay.

page 18

Enter Maritana, Marquis, Marchioness.

Mar

Ah, what tumult here ?

Don

Her arrest, too, Alguazils there,

Enter Alguazils.

Don J

Him to prison; her, that way bear.

Don C

Stay, stay.

Don J

To the villa d'Aranjeuz. away, away.

Don C

What mystery must now control,

It maddens, it distracts my soul.

Don J

With mystery their steps control,

Their meeting would distract ray soul.
Mar What mystery, why thus control.
What horror now awaits my soul ?

Mar Marq & Cho

What mystery does thus control,

Not darker clouds than thunders roll.

Sol & Alg

With mystery their steps control,

What anger hath enraged his soul ?

Mar

Who is he ? Oh, let me see,

I will be free.

Don C

Her let me see. Oh, let me free,

Let me free.

Don J

Away. No, no;

It must not be.

Cho

Away; what terrors dread

Each heart control; what consternation
Fills each soul.

Act III. Scene I.

Recitative.
How dreary to my heart is this gay chamber,
Those crystal mirrors and those marble walls
Add to thy gloom; while sweetly sad remembrance,
The joyful hour of liberty recalls.
My lonely form reflected as I pass,
Seems like a spectre on my steps to wait,
Inquiring from the gold enwreathed glass,
Can mighty grandeur be thus desolate ?

Song.

"Scenes that are Brightest."

Words Copyrighted.

Enter Lazarillo.

Laz

Madame, from the corridor I perceive a carriage. It is Don Jose de Eh ! Not here. I see—again plunged in melancholy. What can this mystery be ? and who is yonder lady, so secluded,—a prisoner in the palace. Should the queen discover that—
page 19

Enter Don Jose.

Don J

Lazarillo.

Laz

Signor.

Don J

Where's the lady ?

Laz

Signor.

Don J

Um. You saw the cavalier who spoke to me yesterday—did you know his features?

Laz

Yes, signor, they are stamped on every piastre in Spain—it was the king.

Don J

True; but mind—no mistake; nevertheless, if your memory fail in least, look on this likeness, and, when he comes to-night—

Laz

The king, signor ?

Don J

Ay, boy, the king; mind, none else must be admitted.

Laz

Should any other attempt ?

Don J

Desire him, from the lattice there, to depart : if he refuse be ready with your arquebuss, and fire at him.

Laz

I obey, signor.

Don J

Having no real authority for the detention of Don Cæsar, he is unfortunately still at liberty, and in Madrid; luckily, however, his ignorance of the King's pardon will keep him out of the way, for fear of a re-apprehension; and the King, amused by the sparkling eyes of the Gitana, will utterly forget the beauteous Queen, that bright idol which he no longer worships, but for one sweet smile of whom Don Jose would too gladly perish.

Aria—Don Jose.
So, my courage still regaining,
Banner waving, trumpet sounding,
Nobly daring, my gauge maintaining,
Forward, heart of chivalry !
So the gallant knight, untiring,
On his gallant steed rebounding,
At his lady's feet expiring,
Dies for love and victory.

Re-enter Maritana.

Mar

That voice.

Don J

Ah, the Countess—

Mar

You ! Oh, do not mock me by that title.

Don J

Nay, it is your own; but you appear uneasy. Have I not kept my word ?

Mar

Perfectly. I am a Countess—I reside in a costly palace. Every desire of my proud heart, save one, has come to pass.

Don J

And that one is your husband. Your cup of delight is now brim full; your husband arrives.

Enter Lazarillo and the King.

Mar

Husband—he?

King

Lovely Maritana, do not fly from me. Wherefore tremble ? Fear'st thou me ?
page 20

Mar

Indeed, yes.

King

Thou art unhappy?

Mar

Indeed, indeed, yes.

King

Wherefore ?

Mar

Pardon. This strange marriage—thou so exalted, I so humble.

King

Listen to me, beautiful Maritana, listen.

Mar

You are my lord—I must obey.

King

Obey ! oh, it is too cold a word. An intruder in the presence of——. Go in, till this be past. I'll follow soon, believe.

Mar

Ah me unlucky Maritana.

King

The prize is mine; at length she believes all.

Don Cæsar appears in balcony.

King

Ha! a man here.

Don C

That's one way of receiving a gentleman, by sending a bullet through his brains.

Enter Lazarillo.

Laz

Don Csesar.

Don C

Eh, who knows me? Pardon, signor, I did not perceive you.

King

Why come you in at the window?

Don C

Refused admittance at the door, the window was the only way. Egad, a man needs a stout courage to storm a fortress under such a brisk cannonade. It is but to show the tip of one's feather above your corridor, and whiz comes a bullet at your head. Spirit of Hospitality, how are thy rights abused.

King

I am master here, and insist on knowing your motive for the intrusion.

Don C

Well then since you are master of the house, I come to seek the Countess de Bazan. They say she lives here.

King

The Countess—do you know her ?

Don C

Ha, ha, ha ! She's the acquaintance of ten minutes only; but if you are master here, tell me where to find her.

King

I tell; are you aware, signor, who I am—

Don C

Who ?

King

Wh—o ! Don Cæsar de Bazan.

Don C

Parbleu ! I must chastise this impostor.

Laz

It is the King.

Don C

Ha ! The King ? here at this hour !

King And who, signor, pray, may you happen to be ? Your name—

Don C

My name ! Oh, you are Don Cæsar de Bazan, I am King of Spain,

Duetto—King and Don Cæsar.

Don C

Surely, as thou art Don Cæsar,
Yes, I am King of Spain; ha, ha, ha !
Yes, yes, I am King of Spain.
Yes, yes, I am King of Spain.
page 21

King

Insolent ! thou the King of Spain,

I can't my mirth restrain. Ha, ha, ha, ha,
The King of Spain.

Don C

Surely, as thou art Don Cæsar. Yes, yes, &c.

King

The King of Spain.

Don C

The King of Spain, &c., &c.

You marvel, signor, at this hour
We, unattended, here are seen,
So near a pretty woman's door,
That woman, too, is not the Queen.
But Kings, you know, like other men,
Sometimes a little thus give way.
Kings are but mortal—Don Cæsar,
Of course you'll not your King betray,

King

Of course, of course,

Don C

Don Cæsar, now I remember well:

A witty, brawling, mad-brained sot,
Beneath his swond it was that fell,
The Captain of our Guard, was't not?
Be kind enough to make it clear,
If shot, as ordered t'other day;
And being dead, how came you here ?
Of course we shall not you betray.

King

Dread sire, your memory is short,

Don C

What forget we ?

King

A most important thing.

Don Cæsar, at eight o'clock, received
The pardon of the King.
The night of his condemnation
He received the pardon of the King.

Don C

Unhappy fate,

The pardon arrived at eight
And I was shot at seven.

King

You to denounce were too late,

You see I am forgiven.

Don C

'Twere useless longer to retain

A title not my own. No, no.

Don C

As you suspect, I—

King

Then you are not the King of Spain.

Don C

No, I my dignity forego.

King

Ha, ha ! I can't my mirth restrain,

So very brief has been your reign,
Most high and mighty King of Spain.

Don C

No, no, I own my title vain,

And doff my borrowed plumes again,
To cry, aloud, vive King of Spain !
No, no, I am not, &c.

Enter Lazarillo.

Laz

Sir, in haste, a messenger.

King

Ah, from the Queen. Arrived at the Palace, and expecting me, just now. Provoking. Boy, call thy fellowship, and order straight they thrust forth yon stranger, page 22 And if our heavy anger thou'dst not incur, see it instant done.

Laz

Sire, I will. My benefactor, Don Caesar, I had nearly shot you just now.

Don C

Never mind, boy; where's that lady?

Laz

If you mean the mysterious lady, who—Ah ! here she comes ! Oh, signor, beware.

Don C

I must speak with her.

Laz

Alas! what peril.

Enter Maritana and Duetto.

Mar

A stranger here !

Don C

Is it thus we greet ?

Mar

That voice, that voice.

Don C

Once more me meet;

'Tis the Zingara.

Mar

Yes, Maritana.

Don C

Oh, Maritana, wild wood flower,

Did they but give thee a prouder name;
To place thee in a kingly bower,
And deck thee with a gilded shame ?

Mar

No, Maritana—tho' in this bower,

Lips the most pure shall never blame;
A captive, in a stranger's power,
She'll perish ere she yield to shame.
But who art thou my conduct thus to scan?

Don C

I am thy husband, Don Cæsar de Bezan.

Mar

My husband?

Thine for ever is the faithful heart.

Don C

Yes, yes, thy husband, never more to part.

Mar

But how prove it ? Dost thou remember

Those words which at the altar thou said'st to me?

Don C

Yes, yes, I'll prove it, I said, remember,

"The rest of existence I devote to thee,"

Both

Yes, yes, oh joy 'tis he.

Both

Yes, yes, oh joy 'tis she.

This heart, with bliss overflowing
Like the nectar bubbling wine
In the light of heaven glowing
Thrills with ecstacy divine.

Enter Lazarillo.

Laz

Fly, Signor, guards approach the palace.

Save thyself, escape.

Don C

Leave thee, my wife, the king at the chamber door !

Mar

In yonder garden walketh the Queen. I saw her from the lattice above Fly to her feet; tell her that poor Maritana is here, a captive—in peril—she will rescue me.

Don C

She—this sword—

Mar

No, no, the Queen alone can, will save me. If you love me, do as I entreat—to the Queen, to the Queen !

Don C

To the Queen !
page 23

DuettOrison.

Mar

and Laz Holy mother guide his footsteps,
Guide them at a moment sure,
When the wicked fall and perish,
When the good are all secure,
Sainted mother, oh, befriend him,
And thy gentlest pity lend him.

Laz

That step, it is the King.

Mar

Again so soon—and I—ah.

Enter The King.

King

Listen to me, lovely Maritana ! it is thy King who adores thee. Listen—my diadem-my kingdom—all the wealth of Spain, I place at thy feet. Give me but thy heart in exchange.

Enter Don C

Mar

My Imsband, sire.

King

Why lock'st thou the door ?

Don C

That none else hear what I now dare to utter; thou art my King—thou'st my dishonour sought—my wife insulted—thus I that wrong repay.

King

Intruder, what ho, who waiteth?

Mar

To death they'll drag thee—by the lattice fly.

Don C

Sire, an instant hear me, I bear a mission.

King

A mission, thou ? from whom ?

Don C

Sire, from the Queen, who would save Maritana.

King

How ! did they dare to admit thee to the presence of Her Majesty ?

Don C

No, sire, they did not admit me by the portal; therefore climbed I the garden wall, resolved to cast myself, un-looked-for, at the feet of the queen.

King

What sought thee of the queen ? Audacious !

Don C

To save my wife. That effort saved my king.

King

Thy king !

Don C

At least his honour. To avoid the notice of the guards, hidden behind the foliage, I heard in converse deep, two voices—a woman's and a man's. Shall I go on ?

King

Proceed.

Don C

"Madame, you are betrayed," said the cavalier to the lady. The king to-night meeteth his mistress in yonder villa."

King

And the traitor was—

Don C

Don Jose !

King

And the lady?

Don C

The queen.

King

The queen ! Unlock the door, I say, and let me forth !

Don C

Thou wouldst arrive too late.

King

Too late. Say's—

Don C

Think'st thou Don Cæsar de Bazan saved the man who, though scorned by his queen, to whom he spoke of love, would have betrayed his king ? No, sire. By this true hand the traitor fell. I have done my utmost to preserve thy honour. Canst thou destroy mine ?
page 24

King

No, Don Cæsar, and may that loyal sword which has preserved the dignity of your King, ever defend with equal bravery thine own. Rise, I hear footsteps.

Now unlock the door.

Enter Lazarillo, Officers, &c., of the King's Household.

Noble Sire, we have sought you at the request of her Majesty. King And found us in the villa Count de Bazan, one of our most loyal subjects. Don Cæsar de Bazan, we appoint you Governor of Valentia.

Don C

Grenada is also vacant, sire.

King

Would you prefer Grenada to Valentia?

Don C

Grenada is one hundred miles from Madrid, sire, and beyond the reach of my creditors.

King

Well, well, Governor of Grenada be it then.

Finale.
With rapture glowing,
Grief no longer one pang bestowing,
Beats this heart with soft love o'erflowing
Every care subdued to rest,
By truth requited !
In this bosom each sorrow blighted,
Love and joy evermore united;
By the smiles of kind friends lighted,
Oh ! what rapture fills each breast.

The end.

H. Brett, Printer, Shortland and Fort Streets. Auckland.