Other formats

    Adobe Portable Document Format file (facsimile images)   TEI XML file   ePub eBook file  

Connect

    mail icontwitter iconBlogspot iconrss icon

The Pamphlet Collection of Sir Robert Stout: Volume 84

Recitative.—Thaddeus

Recitative.—Thaddeus.

Without a country, without a home, without friends, and without fortune—Oh! what will become of the proscribed orphan, Thaddeus of Poland?

Cavatina.
'Tis sad to leave your fatherland,
And friends you loved there well,
To wander on a strange strand,
Where friends but seldom dwell,
Yet, hard as are such ills to bear,
And deeply though they smart,
Their pangs are light to those who are
The orphan of the heart.
Oh, if there were one gentle eye
To weep when I might grieve;
One bosom to receive the sigh
Which sorrow oft will heave;
One heart, the ways of life to cheer
Though rugged they might be;
No language can express how dear
That heart would be to me!

[At the end of song, a troop of Gipsies, headed by Devilshoof, their leader, suddenly appear, and are about to seize and rob Thaddeus.]

Cho.

In the gipsy's life you may read
That life that all would like to lead;
Through the wide world to rove,
But if sunny or drear
With but little to love.
And still less to fear;
Sometimes under roof, and sometimes thrown
Where the wild wolf makes his lair,
page 3 For he who's no home to call his own
Will find a home somewhere,
'Tis the maxim of man,
What's another's to claim !
Then to keep all he can,
And we do the same.
Thus a habit once, 'tis custom grown
And ev'ry man will take care,
If he havn't a home to call his own,
To find a home somewhere.

Tha.

The sight of those wanderers has inspired me [unclear: w] project (To Dev.) Your manner and habit please me. I should like to join your band. I am young, strong, and have, I hope, plenty of courage.

Dev.

Who are you ?

Tha.

One without money, without home, and without

Gip.

Soldiers are coming this way.

Tha.

'Tis me they are in search of !

Dev.

Indeed I then they'll be cunning if they find you.

[They strip the soldier's dress of Thaddeus, and as they are putting a gipsy frock, &c., over him, a roll of parchment with seal attached, falls at the feet of Devilshoof, who seizes it.]

Dev.

What is this?

Tha.

My commission; it is the only thing I possess on earth and I will never part with it.

[Snatches and conceals it in his bosom. Soldiers enter in pursuit.]

Officer

Have you seen any one pass this way—any stranger?

Dev.

No one—stay—yes, a young Polish soldier ran by Just now, and passed up those rocks.

Officer

That's him !—thanks, friend !—forward !

Duet and Chorus.

Dev.

Comrade, your hand,
We understand
Each other in a breath;
This grasp secures
Its honour yours
In life and unto death.

Tha.

Long as it hold

With friendly fold,
Mine shall cling to it;
By death he means, but—
"If there's a throat to cut,
"Why you must do it !"

Cho.

In the gipsy's life you may read, &c.

Tha.

My wants are few—

Dev.

Want we ne'er knew

But what we could supply.
page 4

Tha.

Then what is worse,

I have no purse—

Dev.

We nothing have to buy.

Tha.

My heart 'twill ring—

Dev.

That is a thing

In which we never deal.

Tha.

But all you need—

Dev.

'Twere best indeed,

To borrow, beg, and steal.

Cho.

In the gipsy's life you may read, &c.

Dev.

Then rest you here while we

Explore each spot, and sec
What luck there is in store.

Tha.

The scenes and days to me

Which seem so blest to be,
No time can e'er restore.

Cha.

Oh, what is the worth of the richest man's wealth,

Which the chances are likely he came to by stealth,

Unless he can roam abroad in the free air,

As free as we are from all sorrow and care.

[Loud shouts and alarms are heard. A large body of Huntsmen are seen. Alarms continue. Florestein rushes in

Song.
Is no succour near at hand?
For my intellect so reels,
I am doubtful if I stand,
On my head or on my heels.
No gentlemen, it's very clear,
Such shocks should ever know;
And when I once become a peer
They shall not treat me sa
Then let every vassal arm,
For my thanks he well deserves.
Who from this state of alarm
Will protect my shattered nerves!
To think that one unused to fear,
Such fright should ever know;
But let them make me once a peer,
They shall not treat me so.

[At the end of song Thaddeus and Peasantry rush in.

Tha.

What means this alarm?

Pea.

The Count's child and her attendant have been attacked by an infuriated animal, and are probably killed ere this !

Tha.

What do I hear?

[He perceives the rifle that Florestein has left on the stage, seizes it, runs up the rocks, aims, rushes off. Enter Count Arnheim. Devilshoof enters at one side, watching

Count

Whence proceed these sounds of fear, and where is my darling child?

[Thaddeus is seen rushing in, conveying Arline

page 5

Buda

We were pursued by the wild deer they were chasing, and but for the bravery of this young man, the life of your child would have been sacrificed.

Count

Praised be Providence, her life is saved, for she is all that renders mine happy. Let her wound have every attention, though it presents no sign of danger.

[Buda goes into the castle with Arline, and Count Arnheim advances to Thaddeus.

Count

Stranger, accept the hand of one who, however different to you in station, can never sufficiently thank you for the services you have rendered him.

Dev.

First to serve, and then to be thanked by, the persecutor of his country. The fellow's mad.

Count

I trust you will remain and join the festivities we are about to indulge in; and 'twill be gratify me to know that I can be useful to you.

Tha.

I thank your lordship, but—

Count

Pray, my friends, join your entreaties with mine.

Flo.

I am extremely obliged to you for not shooting me as well as my little cousin—and I beg you'll—aw—stay. A very common sort of personage apparently.

Tha.

Be it as your lordship wishes.

Count

Then be seated, friends and let the Fete begin. I ask you to pledge but once, and that is to the health and long life of your Emperor.

[Here the guests fill their glasses, and, turning towards the statue of the Emperor, drink. Thaddeus alone keeps his seat.

Flo.

Your new acquaintance, my dear uncle, is not over burthened with politeness or loyalty, for he neither fills his glass nor fulfils your wishes.

Count

I challange you to empty this to the health of our Emperor.

Tha.

I accept the challange, and thus I empty the goblet.

[Goes up to the statue and throws down the glass with the utmost contempt.

Chorus.
Down with the daring slave
Who disputes the right
Of a people's delight,
And would their anger brave.

Count

Although 'tis vain to mask
The rage such act demands,
Forgive me if I ask
His pardon at your hands :
It from your wrath I venture to have craved
The lite of one any more than life had saved.
Stranger, I answer not.
One momen' for your life;
Quit while you may a spot
Where you have raised strife,
page 6 Your longer presence will more excite.
And this will the service you did me requite.

[Devilshoof rushes in—throws Thaddeus a purse of gold

Where is the hand will dare to touch
One hair of a head I prize so much.

(To Count)

That pulse of pride you boast,
Within me beats as high;
You and your titled host,
Proud lord I do defy.

Flo.

Upon my life 'tis most unpleasant,

Just as one had attacked a pheasant

[Thaddeus, who has taken up the purse, and seeing himself and Devilshoof surrounded by nobles and guests, throws the purse at the Count's feet.

Take back your gold and learn to know
One—above aught you can bestow.

Cho.

Down with the daring slave,
Who would our fury brave.
Dev. Stand back ye craven things,
Who dare obstruct our path,
Upon his rashness brings
The vengeance of my wrath,

[Devilshoof, defending Thaddeus, retreats; the Count orders a party of his retainers to divide them; they seize Devilshoof.

Seize him and bind him, and there let him find Escape from those walls, better men have confined,

[They march Thaddeus off

Dev.

Tho' meshed by numbers in the yoke.
Of one by all abhor'd,
Yet tremble, worthless lord.
At the vengeance you thus provoke.

Cho.

Down with the daring slave

Who would our fury brave.

[Devilshoof is seen descending from the roof of the castle until he reaches Arline's chamber, into which he enters. Buda signifies by her gestures that Arline has disappeared.

Cho.

What sounds break on the air?
What looks of wild despair,
A grief as wild impart?

Count

My child! that word alone,

With agonizing tone.
Bursts in upon my ears.
[Count and Nobles dash into the castle.

Cho.

Be every hand prepared

Their liege lord's halls to guard,
With devotion whose bond
All ties its beyond.

Flor.

Why, what with dancing, screeming, fighting

One really is a shocking plight in,
page 7 And it puzzles one's wit
To find a place to pick a bit.

[The Count drags Buda from the castle, Buda falls on her knees.

Count

Wretch, monster, give me back
The treasure of my soul;
Go—all—the spoiler's footprints track
The treasured prize who stole,
But no, vain hope unless we pray to him
Who heals all sorrows with suppliant limb.

Prayer.
Thou, who in might supreme,
O'er the fate of all reignest;
Thou who hope's palest beam
In the mourner sustainest!
Vouchsafe to lend an ear
To the grief of the wailer;
Cut short the dark career
Of the ruthless assailer.

[Devilshoof is seen climbing rocks with Arlino.]

Chorus.
Follow, follow, with heart and with arm;
Follow, follow, and shelter from harm,
The pride of Arnheim's live,
Where all its hopes entwine,
Follow, follow,
O'er brake and through the hollow.

Climb the hill and ford the stream,
High in air weapon's gleam;
Dash through where danger lies !
Danger-aye death despise !
To save, let all combined,
The pride of Arnheim's line.

[At the most animated part of the Chorus, bodies of the Gentry, Retainers, Servants, &c., are seen rushing towards the rock in pursuit of Devilshoof, who, perceiving his situation, knocks away, the moment he has crossed it, the tree which serves as a bridge between the two rocks. Count Arnheim in his distraction, is about to throw himself into the gulph—he is held back by his attendants, into whose arms he falls senseless. Some are in attitude of prayer, others menace Devilshoof, who folding Arline in his large cloak, disappears in the depths of the forest.