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Salient: Victoria University Students' Paper. Vol. 28, No. 7. 1965.

[introduction]

A Vietnamese woman walks through the ruins of her village burnt in the war. A South Vietnamese soldier stands behind her

A Vietnamese woman walks through the ruins of her village burnt in the war. A South Vietnamese soldier stands behind her

For many weeks American academic circles have been the scene of much discontent: the focus of this discontent has been current United States policy in South Vietnam.

The United States' role in the Dominican Republic has added further fuel to the heated dialogue between the academics and the Administration.

A week ago this dialogue took a new turn: a debate broadcast over national radio networks took place. Opponents and proponents of the current Vietnam policy, primarily drawn from within Academia confronted each other.

To place the following report in perspective two prefatory comments are necessary: firstly, the academic world, both professors and students, is divided on the rightness or otherwise of current USA policy—it could also be noted that neither supporters nor opponents of the Johnson Line are in internal unilateral agreement.

Secondly, the Johnson policy has been to treat with disdain most of its critics: in many cases members of the government, notably Secretary Dean Rusk, have resorted to the familiar labels of "unpatriotic attitudes" or even less appropriate comments to damn its critics before the American public.

In the following article I will try to present a distillation of the Debate: I have attempted to present all views as accurately and fairly as possible, for this reason personal comment will be kept to a minimum.

In order to preserve some continuity I have divided the comments into three: (i) Comments on Past Policy in South Vietnam: (ii) The Present Dilemma: (iii) The Lines of Resolution. Inevitably these somewhat artificial categories overlap.

A Vietnamese woman walks through the ruins of her village—burnt in the war. A South Vietnamese soldier stands behind her