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The New Zealand Railways Magazine, Volume 6, Issue 2 (June 1, 1931)

Increasing the Power of Existing Locomotives

Increasing the Power of Existing Locomotives.

In main-line working, the problem of handling heavier trains with existing locomotive equipment is often a difficult one. Faced with the question of everincreasing loads the Paris-Orleans Railway of France has just put in hand the interesting work of rebuilding several of its “Pacific” locomotives with a view to augmenting their power.

The Orleans locomotives had a relatively large grate area (4.27 square metres), but they were not altogether
A Passenger Train of World Renown. London-Cornwall “Atlantic Coast Express” on the Southern Railway, South Western Main Line, England.

A Passenger Train of World Renown.
London-Cornwall “Atlantic Coast Express” on the Southern Railway, South Western Main Line, England.

satisfactory from the viewpoint of steam production; their superheating qualities were poor; and owing to the wiredrawing occurring at high speeds between the high-pressure cylinder outlet and the low-pressure cylinder inlet, full use was not being made of the steam. The work put in hand included the introduction of the Nicholson siphon to facilitate the circulation of water in the boiler, the enlargement of the ashpan openings to assist the entry of air into the firebox, and the improvement of the draught by the removal of the existing trefoil exhaust, and its replacement by a new type of exhaust with a double smokestack. A Schmidt superheater has also been installed, using 32 large smoke tubes as compared with the 24 tubes formerly employed. Lentz-Dabeg valve distribution has also been introduced; the throttle valve, steam intake pipes, high-pressure steam chests and by-pass cut-offs have been increased in section to get rid of wiredrawing; and mechanical lubricators installed for the driving mechanism and driving and coupled axles. Increase of power amounting to as much as fifty per cent, has been secured, and fuel consumption has been considerably reduced.