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The New Zealand Railways Magazine, Volume 2, Issue 1 (April 21, 1927)

Farmers' Trains

Farmers' Trains.

Considerable interest is being taken in the Canterbury District regarding the proposal of the Railway Department to run special trains in the farming interest in the South Island. The Christchurch “Sun” thus sums up the position:—

The Farmers of Canterbury should feel honoured that this province has been selected by the Railway Department for the inauguration in the South Island of the special “farmers' train” excursions, which have been designed, in part, with a view to providing cheap holidays in the off-season for country residents whose work on the land debars them from taking advantage of the reduced fares offered at regular holiday times. It is proposed to begin with a train run from the West Coast to some part of Canterbury, the visit to be returned at a later date.

Some hundred and thirty farmers and farmers' wives from the Waikato patronised the Department's first venture of this type last winter, when a special train was run to and from Hawera on the occasion of the South Taranaki Winter Show. Then, as would be the procedure in Canterbury too, an officer of the Department of Agriculture travelled on the train, and the farming possibilities of the several classes of land lying along the route were fully explained, although in such a way as not to disturb the holiday spirit of the audience.

As far as possible, it is desired that the passengers should be billeted by farmers in the terminal district, for only by “talking shop,” comparing notes, and observing other methods of tillage, feeding, and breeding, can settlers from one part receive maximum benefit from a visit to another farming centre. But even when some of the excursionists may have to be accommodated in barracks, district farmers' organisations may assist by arranging field days and evening entertainments, to mutual advantage.

If only for the holiday facilities which it has made available to him, the Railway Department has earned the thanks of the farmer by this latest extension of its activities. But the possible fruits of the scheme include much more than pleasant holidays, and the opportunity soon to be presented to Canterbury and Westland will be the beginning of a further definite contribution by the State transport service to the prosperity, as well as the happiness, of the man on the land.

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Scenes that make history. Assembly of the League of Nations at Geneva on the occasion of Germany's entry into the League, September, 1926. New Zealand was represented by Rt. Hon. Sir Francis Bell (with Mr. J. S. Hunter as private secretary and Hon. Sir James Parr, High Commissioner). Herr Stresemann (Germany) making his initial speech.

Scenes that make history. Assembly of the League of Nations at Geneva on the occasion of Germany's entry into the League, September, 1926. New Zealand was represented by Rt. Hon. Sir Francis Bell (with Mr. J. S. Hunter as private secretary and Hon. Sir James Parr, High Commissioner).
Herr Stresemann (Germany) making his initial speech.