Other formats

    TEI XML file   ePub eBook file  

Connect

    mail icontwitter iconBlogspot iconrss icon

The Cyclopedia of New Zealand [Otago & Southland Provincial Districts]

Lawrence

Lawrence.

Lawrence , the chief town in the county of Tuapeka, is the terminus of the branch line from Milton, whence it is twenty-four miles distant. It is sixty miles by rail from Dunedin, with which it has communication twice daily, and there is a daily coach service between Lawrence and Roxburgh. There has been for many years a considerable, waggon traffic from Lawrence to the interior of Central Otago, but this is being gradually lessened in proportion with the progressive construction of the
Lawrence In 1870.

Lawrence In 1870.

Otago Central Railway. Lawrence, which, war named alter a celebrated English general, is the centre of a large mining and farming district. It came into existence with the gold “rush” to Gabriel's Gully, which is about two miles distant. This celebrated goldfield is a favourite place of interest with visitors, and in the surrounding district, gold mining is still carried on on an extensive scale by modern scientific methods. Sheep-farming is also carried oil, and stock sales are held fortnightly in the town. Lawrence is built for the most part on rising ground, and stands at an elevation of 356 feet above sea level, The chambers of the Tuapeka County Council, the district hospital, and the Magistrate's and Warden's court are located in the town, of which Ross Place is the chief business portion. Besides the District High School, there is a Catholic school, under the supervision of the Dominican nuns; and there are Presbyterian, Anglican, Roman Catholic, and Wesleyan churches, and a local corps of the Salvation Army. Two branch banks, a number of stores, and several hotels, constitute the main business houses, and there is also a flour mill. A local newspaper, the “Tuapeka Times,” is published twice a week. A town hall, which stands in Ross Place, was built in 1877, at a cost of £3,500, and is a handsome stone building, with brick and stucco facings. On each side page 678 of the entrance there is a shop, and the two bring in a yearly rental of £78. The council chambers, on the first floor, are large and well furnished; and the hall, sixty feet by thirty-five foot, has a well-appointed stage, which gives an additional twenty feet in length. The main streets of Lawrence are lighted with twenty-two kerosene lamps. The streets are wide, and the pavements are asphalted, while some of the roads in the residential parts of the town are edged with ornamental trees. The borough has several endowments, including one at Tuapeka West, of 1,000 acres, which brings in a rental of £86 per annum: a cricket ground of four acres, and a Domain Board reserve of about forty acres, partly laid out and planted with ornamental trees. A cemetery, ten acres in extent, is prettily situated, on rising ground, on the Evan's Flat, mad. The water supply is drawn from the head of the Gabriel's Gully creek, and brought along seven miles of open water race to the town reservoir. The No. 1 reservoir is two acres in extent, and holds 4,000,000 gallons' of water, and the No. 2 reservoir holds 500,000 gallons. Two and a quarter miles of water mains are laid under the principal streets, and in Boss Place the water has a pressure of 170 feet. There is a fire brigade station, with reels, hydrants, 400 yards of hose, and all necessary fittings. A system of surface draining, with large storm-channels leading to the Tuapeka river, has been laid out, at a cost of £3,500. The local Athenæum, which has been in existence for about thirty-fire years, was erected at a eost of £600, and the library contains 5,000 volumes. There is a rifle volunteer corps at Lawrence, and there are also a number of athletic and social organisations.

The Borough Of Lawrence , which has an area of 610 acres, was formerly divided into wards, but it is now one undivided borough, with a population of nearly 1,200 persons. The annual rateable value is £8,504, and there is a general rate of 1s 6d in the pound on the annual letting value; a water rate of 6d in the pound where the water is laid on, and a proportionate rate where it is Hot. The members of the Borough Council are: Messrs George Jeffery (Mayor), James Bryco McKinlay, Herbert Hastings Leary, Benjamin Warren Whin, Alexander Blair, David Lawrence Christie, Arthur Bryan Haggitt, Walter Anderson, David McIntosh, and Hugh Craig (Councillors). Mr. Philip Uren is the Town Clerk and Treasurer.

Councillor Benjamin Warren Winn , who has been, a Member of the Lawrence Borough Council since 1894, was born in 1866, in London, where he was educated. He came to the Colony in 1877, by the ship “Piako,” and entered into articles with Mr. Scanlan, of Dunedin, with whom he served for seven years. In 1890, he settled in Lawrence, to carry on his trade as a painter and house decorator. Mr. Winn is captain of the Fire Brigade, vice-president of the United Fire Brigades' Association of New Zealand, a past master in Freemasonry, and also a prominent member and trustee of
Lawrence In 1898.

Lawrence In 1898.

page 679 the Oldfellows; and when the local volunteers were in existence he was corporal of the corps. Mr. Winn was elected Mayor of Lawrence in December, 1899, and re-elected in
Councillor B. W. .

Councillor B. W. [gap — reason: illegible].

April, 1901; and, after his second term, was re-elected as a councillor. He was appointed a Justice of the Peace in March, 1903; and is a member of the Tuapeka Park and Recreation Grounds Domain Board.

Mr. Philip Uren , Town Clerk, Returning Officer, and Rate Collector for the Borough of Lawrence, was born in Cornwall, England, on the 27th of November, 1841. He was educated at the grammar school, Gwennap, brought up to mining find assaying, in his native place, and came to Port Chalmers in 1863. After being for eight or nine years at Gabriel's Gully he received a Government appointment to look after the Waipori Drainage Channel, and held the position till the channel was destroyed by the Hood of 1875. Mr. Uren was rate collector and valuer for the County of Tuapeka, under the Land and Property Act, 1870. In 1882, he was appointed Town Clerk of Lawrence, in succession to the late Mr. G. Byron King.

Mr. John Carse Arbuckle , who was Mayor of Lawrence during the Exhibition year, was born at Kilmarnock, Ayrshire, Scotland, in 1839. He left his native country in 1852 by the ship “Sappho,” and landed at Port Phillip, Melbourne, where he was for some years in the service of the City of Melbourne Gas and Coke Company. Mr. Arbuckle joined the staff of the Union Bank of Australia, and followed banking for about five years in Victoria and New Zealand, but eventually established his present business in Lawrence. He was for many years a member of the Borough Council, and was elected mayor in 1888, and for three years thereafter. During his term of office the new road to the cemetery was made, and several other important works carried out. Mr. Arbuckle was for several years president of the Athenæum, and chairman of the High School committee. In 1895 he was appointed Returning Officer for the electoral district of Tuapeka. Mr. Arbuckle is a member of St. George's Masonic Lodge. He married a daughter of Mr. Horace Bastings (sometime mayor of Lawrence and member of the Provincial Council), and has a family of five sons and two daughters.

Mr. J. C. Browne was born in Victoria in 1860, and is a son of Mr. G. P. C. Browne, who for many years was a member of the Outgo Provincial Council. He came to New Zealand when only a child, and received his education at Waitahuna. For seven years he followed the vocation of a teacher in Dunedin, and removed to Lawrence in 1885. On his father's death, he and his brothers carried on their father's forwarding agency business. In 1886 the coal, timber and carriers' business was purchased from Mr. Thomas McKenzie, and added to the forwarding agency, and the business as a whole has undergone considerable extensions. Mr. Browne was first elected mayor in November, 1895; he was re-elected unopposed in 1896 and 1897, and at the election of 1898 he defeated his opponent. He has served on the Athenæum committee, is a director of the Tuapeka Times Company, a member of the District High school committee, secretary of the Tuapeka Agricultural and Horticultural Societies, and president of the Tuapeka Brass Band. Mr. Browne was married in 1890, and has a family of two.

Mr. Jonas Harrop , J.P., who was at one time Mayor of the Borough of Lawrence, and served on the Council for many years,
The Late Mr. J. Harrop.

The Late Mr. J. Harrop.

was born in Macclesfield, Cheshire, England, in the year 1840. He was educated in England, and came to Victoria with his father in the fifties; settled in the Tuapeka, district in 1861, and began business in the following year as a chemist and druggist. Mr. Harrop served on the local school committee for some time, and was a visiting justice at the local gaol. He was connected with the Manuchester Unity, Independent Order of Oddfellows, for many years, page 680 and held office as treasurer of that body. Mr. Harrop was married, in 1803. to a daughter of the late Mr. R. Jones, C.E., of London, and at his death, in 1889, he left two sons and three daughters.

Mr. Edward Herbert , who was Mayor of Lawrence in the early days in the borough, was long well known as a partner in the firm of Herbert and Co., general merchants. He was born in Rothesay, Scotland, came to the Colony early in 1862, and became senior partner in the firm which bears his name, and with which he continued to be identified till May, 1900, when he retired from the business. Besides being mayor, Mr. Herbert took a very active part in advocating and promoting the establishment of the public school, now known as the Lawrence District High school, on the committee of which he served for many years. About twenty-five years ago he obtained permission from the Borough Council to plant some streets with deciduous trees. He spent a large sum in planting a long avenue with a double row of trees, and the work thus begun by him was afterwards continued by the Borough Council, with much advantage to the beauty of the town. Mr. Herbert now (1904) resides in Dunedin.

Mr. George Ormerod Taylor , who was Mayor of Lawrence for two years and was for many years a member of the Council, was born at Aecrington, Lancashire, England, in 1848. He was educated and apprenticed as a chemist and druggist, in Preston. After completing his term, he was for about three years junior assistant in a large business in Manchester, and for four years senior assistant in a large West End business in London. In 1875, he came to Port Chalmers by the ship “City of Vienna,” and for a year after his arrival, waa assistant to Mr B. Isaac, in Rattray Street, Dunedin. Mr. Taylor removed to Lawrence in 1876, as manager for Mr. G. Jeffrey, the proprietor of the business which he subsequently purchased. He served for a short time on the Tuepeka Hospital Board. Mr. Taylor was married, in 1884, to a daughter of Mr. W. Sheath, sheepfarmer, of Rankleburn, and has three daughters and one son.

Mr. Thomas Arthur , who was for a short time a Member of the Lawrence Borough Council, was born in Glasgow, in 1831, and educated in his native city. He came to Victoria in 1850, and was at Ballarat and Bendigo, and in the Ovens district, where he was in business as a storekeeper, before coming to Otago in 1862. After a short time in Dunedin, he settled in the Tuapeka district, and established himself in business. As a Freemason, he was a member of Lodge St. George, E.C., and passed all the chairs. He was also connected with the Manchester Unity, Independent Order of Oddfellows. Mr. Arthur was married, in 1872, to the widow of the late Mr. J. Hunter, of Dumfries, and at his death, in 1898, left two sons and two daughters.

The Late Mr. T. Arthur.

The Late Mr. T. Arthur.

Mr. Peter Skinner , who represented the West Ward in the Lawrence Borough Council for many years, was born in Dingwall, Ross-shire, Scotland, in 1856, and was apprenticed as a saddler at Kirkcaldy, in Fifeshire. Mr. Skinner came to Port Chalmers, by the ship “Janet Cort,” in May, 1874, and was for twelve years in the employment of Mr. G. Dowse, saddler, of Rattray Street, Dunedin, and was foreman of the workshop. He removed to Lawrence in 1888, and purchased the business of Mr. Peter Millar, saddler, later of Dunedin. Mr. Skinner was married, in 1876, to a daughter of the late Mr. J. Heron, of Kilmarnock, Scotland, and had two daughters and one son. He died in November, 1901.

The Late Mr. P. Skinner And Mrs Skinner.

The Late Mr. P. Skinner And Mrs Skinner.

Mr. John Thompson , J.P., who was a member of the Lawrence Borough Council, was born in 1836, in West Meath. Ireland, and was educated at Farra College. He became a land steward, and served three years with Mr. Smith, of Glananea estate, and afterwards held the position of land agent on the Annesley estates in the south of Ireland for nine years. He left London for Melbourne in August, 1867, by the s.s. “Somersetshire,” on her first voyage, and landed in New Zealand in October, 1867. page 681 After farming in the Waitahuna district for two years he became clerk and bailiff at the Magistrate's Court at Lawrence. In 1878 he acquired a half interest in the “Tuapeka Times” and also began a land agency business. He subsequently sold his interest in the paper, but continued the agency, to which he has added that of stock agent and auctioneer. He was returned to the Borough Council in 1879, became mayor in 1883, and was for years continuously a member of the Council. Since 1870 he has been on the local District High school committee, and was for some years its chairman. He has been a Justice of the Peace since 1884. As a Freemason he is attached to Lodge St. George, E.C., of which he is a senior warden. Mr. Thompson was married, in 1863, to a daughter of Mr. Walter Benn, of Newbury Mills, Mallow. This lady died in 1874, leaving four daughters and one son. In 1879 Mr. Thompson contracted a second marriage with a daughter of Mr. Richard W. Nichols, of Fleet Farm, Lawrence, and has a second family of nine sons, all living.

Mr. George Walker was born at Killingholme, Lincolnshire, in 1835. He left home at the age of twenty-one, landed in Melbourne, Victoria, from the ship “Samuel Lock” in August, 1857, and engaged in agricultural contracts. In January, 1862, he came to Otago, and went goldmining at Tuapeka, and after a time he and eight others formed a syndicate to work the coal pit in Lawrence. When the Dunstan “rush” broke out, his mates unanimously left him in charge, and went to the new goldfields. Some of them returned in four months but Mr. Walker bought all their shares, and worked at the coal pit for a number of years. He then sold it to a company for £650, retaining one-sixth of the whole of the estate, but ultimately sold out the lot to Messrs McCormack and Nicholl, of Blue Spur, for £1,200. Mr. Walker then started in business in Ross Place as a hay and corn merchant, and has ever since been engaged in that line. When Lawrence was formed into a borough, he was second on the poll of nine candidates, when only four candidates were required, and was a member of the Council for many years. About nineteen years ago he was elected mayor, and held the office for two years, being unopposed for the second term. When he was mayor he visited Wellington as one of a deputation to act with Mr. J. C. Brown to procure a Government grant of £2,000 to form a storm channel to protect the town from flood by the Wetherstones and Gabriel's waters, a work which was his own proposition, and since then no flood has ever done damage to the outlying parts of the borough. For many years he was a member of the hospital committee; he has been a member of the Oddfellows Lodge for twenty-five years, and has passed through all its offices. Mr. Walker has a family of four daughters and two sons, and has several grandchildren.

The County Of Tuapeka lies between the counties of Clutha, Bruce, and Vincent, and comprises an area of 1,385 square miles. The Council buildings, which were erected in 1878, stand in Peel Street, Lawrence, with an entrance from a private roadway. There are offices for the chairman, clerk, and engineer; and the council chamber is a large and well-appointed room. The members of the Council are: Messrs Sim (chairman), Tapanui riding; Robert Cotton, Waipori riding; Edward Ottrey, James riding; James Bennet, Beaumont riding; Francis Oudaille, Waitahunia riding; John Bennetts, Teviot riding; P. Melnerey, Brown's riding; G. S. Walker, Clark riding; and J. K. Simpson, Gabriel's riding. Mr. John J. Woods is county clerk, treasurer, and collector, and Messrs Pilling Brothers are the valuers. Meetings are held on the second Friday of the month, at 2 p.m. There are 1,600 ratepayers, and the rateable properties, which number 1,800, have a rateable value of £993,000. A rate of one penny in the pound is levied. On the 31st of March, 1904, the assets amounted to £1,462, and the liabilities were £1,704. The Council maintains one thousand miles of road.

Mr. James Sim , J.P., Chairman of the Tuapeka County Council, was born at Dunkeld, Perthshire, Scotland, in 1832. From his earliest days he was engaged in
Mr. G. Walker.

Mr. G. Walker.

Ross Place, Showing Town Hall, Lawrence.

Ross Place, Showing Town Hall, Lawrence.

Mr. J. Sim.

Mr. J. Sim.

page 682 country pursuits, and was farming on his own account for several years before coming to New Zealand. Mr. Sim arrived in Auckland by the ship “Avalanche,” in the year 1860. In the same year he went to the Snowy River diggings, New South Wales, but returned shortly afterwards to New Zealand, and settled at the Taieri, where he took up land and engaged in carting to the diggings for a number of years. In 1876 Mr. Sim settled in the Crookston district, where he holds 1,000 acres of freehold land, chiefly devoted to sheepfarming. He is a member of the Otago Education Board, the Clutha River Board, the Crookston school committee, a trustee of the Kelso Agricultural and Pastoral Association grounds; and was first elected to the Tuapeka County Council in 1893. Mr. Sim was married, in 1860, to a daughter of the late Mr. Bowen, of South Wales, and has two sons.

Councillor James Bennet , who was Chairman of the Tuapeka County Council for about ten years, became a member of the Council in 1876, as representative for Beaumont riding. He was born in Forfarshire, Scotland, in 1830, was brought up to agriculture, and emigrated in 1853 to Victoria, where he followed goldmining for a short time, and was afterwards engaged in carting to the goldfields till he came to Otago in 1865. Mr. Bennet was carting to the Otago goldfields until 1872, when he settled in the Crookston district, and he has ever since lived at Race's Junction. His property consists of 700 acres of freehold land, and he has also two small runs, of about 4,000 acres, on which he depastures 2,000 sheep. He has served on the local school committee, of which he has been chairman since 1895. Mr. Bennet was married, early in 1853, to a daughter of Mr. Alexander Lindsay, of Forfarshire, Scotland, and has three sons, one daughter, and twelve grandchildren. He represents the electoral district of Tuapeka in the House of Representatives.

Councillor J. Bennet And Mrs Bennet.

Councillor J. Bennet And Mrs Bennet.

Councillor Francis Oudaille , J.P., who was one of the original Members of the Tuapeka County Council, and was for several years its chairman, represents the Waitahuna riding. He was born in Jersey in 1837, educated in Paris, and came to Sydney with his parents in 1850. In 1852, he had a short experience at Bendigo, and was generally on the Victorian and New South Wales goldfields till March, 1862, when he arrived in Port Chalmers and settled at Waitahuna, where he established himself in business as a storekeeper in August of that year. Mr. Oudaille unsuccessfully contested the representation of Tuapeka in Parliament against the late Mr. J. C. Brown. He has acted as a member of the local school committees, and has generally taken an interest in the advancement of the district. Mr. Oudaille was married in 1855, and has three sons, three daughters, and twelve grandchildren.

Councillor F. Oudaille.

Councillor F. Oudaille.

Councillor James Kerr Simpson , J.P., A Member of the Tuapeka County Council, was born in Edinburgh, Scotland, and, comes of a very old, well-known family, one of whom was a doctor in India, and another a doctor in the army. He left home when a child, with his parents, by the “Strathallan,” and landed at Dunedin, where his father entered into business as a general merchant, and did an extensive trade with the various goldfields. Mr. J. K. Simpson entered the service of Messrs Marshall and Copeland, at their brewery, Leith Valley, and romained there till he was about twenty-one years of age, when he went to Tuapeka under engagement to Messrs Clayton and McNab, whose employment he afterwards left to take up a more lucrative appointment in Vincent and Co.'s brewery, Christchurch. On returning to Tuapeka, Mr. Simpson took over the Black Horse Brewery in association with Mr. Hart, and the firm of Messrs Simpson and Hart, brewers, etc., was founded. He was at one time chairman of directors of the Tuapeka Times Company, and is still a director. He is chairman of the commonage committee, and from the first did much to secure grazing rights for the miners. For about ten years he has been chairman of the Wetherstones school committee, and he is also a member of the Tuapeka Goldfields Hospital Board. Eight years ago he was elected to the Tuapeka County Council, in which he represents Gabriel's riding. Mr. Simpson was married in 1892 to Miss Jessie Pope, a daughter of an old identity now resident in Lawrence, and a descendant of the Popes of Wickford House, Devonshire, England.

Councillor J. K. Simpson.

Councillor J. K. Simpson.

Mr. John Joseph Woods , Clerk, Treasurer and Collector of the Tuapeka County Council, was born in 1849, in Tasmania, where he received his education, and was a teacher for eight or nine years. He then came to New Zealand, and landed on the West Coast. After visiting Nelson, Wellington, Christchurch and Dunedin, Mr. Woods taught in private schools at Lawrence and Invercargill, making a specialty of music, but retired from that vocation on receiving his present appointment. Mr. Woods, however, is an enthusiastic musician and also a composer. He performs on twelve instruments, but chiefly on the violin. There is hardly a musical performance in the district in which he does not take part, and for many years he has been conductor of the Roman Catholic Church choir. He was well known as a cricketer; he won the first trophy ever competed for by the members of the Lawrence Bowling Club, and he is a successful tennis player. Mr. Woods is also captain of page 683 the Lawrence Cycling Club, and consul for the New Zealand Cycling Touring Club. He has three sons and one daughter, who occupies a unique position in the annals of musical tuition in New Zealand. As the composer of the score of the New Zealand National Anthem, Mr. Woods himself stands high in the matter of musical distinction within the Colony. Many years ago he won the prize of £10 offered by the “New Zealand Saturday Advertiser,” then conducted by the author of the Anthem, Mr. Thomas Bracken. There were a number of competitors, and the judges, Messrs Zelman, Zephin, and Siede, of Melbourne, awarded the prize to Mr. Woods. The piece, set to Mr. Woods' music, is now sung in the public schools as the Colony's National Anthem, and when Mr. Seddon was in England at the Jubilee celebrations in 1897, he presented a copy to the Queen, who commanded that it should be forwarded to Buckingham Palace.

Lawrence In The Middle Nineties.

Lawrence In The Middle Nineties.

Mr. James John Gibson , sometime Valuer of Mining Properties for the Tuapeka County Council, Agent for the Public Trustee, and Secretary of the Tuapeka County Jockey Club, was born in Peebleshire, Scotland, in 1856, and received his early education in Edinburgh. He was brought up to business in a large mercantile house, in Leith, and came to Port Chalmers by the ship “Tamaru” in 1877. For a number of years he was engaged in pastoral work, but ultimately settled in Lawrence, in 1889, when he commenced business as a mining and commission agent. Mr. Gibson was a member of the local school committee, a vice-president of the Lawrence Caledonian Society and secretary of the Success and Balclutha Gold Dredging Companies. Mr. Gibson lived on the boundary of the borough, having purchased the freehold of the Presbyterian glebe, which is about thirty-five acres in extent. He was married, in 1881, to a daughter of the late Mr. J. Stevenson, of Horseshoe Bend, and had three sons and two daughters. Mr. Gibson died on the 22nd of October, 1901.

The Late Mr. J. J. Gibson.

The Late Mr. J. J. Gibson.

Mr. Edward Tubman , who was a Member of the Tuapeka County Council, and represented the James riding for three years, was born in County Cavan, Ireland, in 1835. He was brought up to agriculture, and came out to Victoria in 1857. Six years later he crossed the Tasman Sea to Otago, and settled in the Roxburgh district. He has followed mining at Naseby, Butcher's Gully, Pomahaka and Roxburgh. Mr. Tubman was one of the first to take up land at Dumbarton, for agricultural purposes, under the original leasing system, on the 12th of September, 1867. The property he then acquired, and which is now freehold, consists of 332 acres, and he holds twenty-one acres under an occupation license. Mr. Tubman has served on the Moa Flat school committee, of which he was at one time chairman. In the early days he and his two brothers, and a Mr. Porter, purchased the punt at Roxburgh, at a cost of £800, and worked it for a number of years, until the erection of the bridge. For the last five or six years he has kept the Dumbarton post office and telephone bureau. Mr. Tubman was married, in 1879, to a daughter of Mr. M. Tweed, of Lovell's Flat, Otago, and has three sons and three daughters.

The Lawrence Railway Station was established in 1878, and is the terminus of the Tuapeka railway, which branches from the main line at Clarksville, near Milton. The station buildings are of iron and wood, and include an engine shed, and a goods shed capable of storing about 100 tons. The passengers' platform is completely asphalted. A considerable quantity of dredging and mining machinery is brought here from Dunedin for distribution in the surrounding districts, to which it is forwarded from Lawrence by waggons. Mr. Thomas Arthur is stationmaster.

page 684

The Lawrence Post And Telegraph Office is situated at the corner of Colonsay and Peel Streets, and is a brick building with cement facings. There are ten telephones connected with the office, which is a transmitting office for the district, to Roxburgh and the other country offices. The staff consists of the postmaster, telegraphist, cadet, and letter carrier, and the Lawrence office does the largest amount of business of any second-class office in Otago. Mr. J. T. Wylie is postmaster.

The Tuapeka Hospital stands on five acres of land at the corner of Whitehaven and Harrington Streets. The older portion of the building dates back to 1861, and is now used for outhouses; but the present hospital is a one-storey brick building, with three wards, two of which are for men, and one for women; in addition to the dispensary, storeroom, and quarters for the wardsman and matron. A separate residence is available for the use of the resident medical officer.

Miss Fanny Corry , Matron of the Tuapeka Goldfields Hospital, was appointed to her present position in July, 1897.

Mr. Arthur Baily Fearn , Wardsman of the Tuapeka Goldfields Hospital, was born in Derbyshire, England, in 1870, and educated at Invercargill. He arrived at Port Chalmers with his parents by the ship “Earl of Zetland,” in 1875, was appointed to the Southland Hospital, as a wardsman, in 1891, and continued there till 1898, when, after a short residence at the Riverton Hospital, in a similar capacity, he was appointed to his present position.

Lawrence Post Office And Court Buildings.

Lawrence Post Office And Court Buildings.

The Lawrence District High School , which was established as a public school in 1864, and became a high school in 1878, is situated on a block of two acres and a half of land, which was at one time known as the Market Reserve. The building is of stone, of one storey, and contains six rooms, with accommodation for 350 pupils. There are 270 names on the roll, and the average attendance is about 240. The school has a capital play-ground, with covered sheds and other conveniences, and the local drill-shed is used for the purposes of a gymnasium. The staff consists of the rector, matron, first and second assistants, and three pupil teachers.

Mr. John Stenhouse , Rector of the Lawrence District High School, was born at Biggar, Lanarkshire, Scotland, in 1842, and educated at the Stirling parish school. He served a pupil teachership at the Calder parish school for four years, and was afterwards at the Normal Training College in Glasgow, and the Glasgow University. Having gained a teacher's certificate, he taught at the Chapel and Woodhall schools, near Airdrie, for one year at each, and subsequently at the Auchinear parish school, for two years. In 1864, Mr. Stenhouse came to Port Chalmers by the ship “City of Dunedin,” and was appointed to open the school at Lawrence. He is a member of the Otago Educational Institute, and has occupied the position of vice-president, besides being repeatedly president of the Tuapeka branch of the Institute. On the occasion of Mr. Stenhouse celebrating the conclusion of twentyfive years of rectorship at the Lawrence school, he was presented with an illuminated address, a handsome piece of plate, and with an album, containing upwards of 400 signatures of present and past pupils, residing in New Zealand, Australia, Scotland, and other parts of the world. The gathering at which the presentation was made was held in the Town Hall. Mr. Stenhouse was married, in 1866, to a daughter of the late Mr Anderson, of Pathhead, near Kirkcaldy, and has three sons and three daughters.

Miss Jane Beatrice Fowler , Mistress of the Lawrence District High School, was born at Durham, England, and came to Victoria, with her parents, at a tender age, and subsequently to Otago. Miss Fowler was educated at the Lawrence District High school, where she qualified as a teacher. After two years as headmistress at the Wetherstones school, she was appointed to her present position at Lawrence in 1883. Miss Fowler holds an E1 certificate.

Mr. Henry Lawrence Darton , First Assistant Master of the Lawrence District High school, was born at Tuapeka on the page 685 31st of December, 1863, and educated at the Lawrence grammar school, where he served his pupil teachership. Mr. Darton afterwards studied for two years at the Normal Training College, Dunedin, and was appointed to the position of first assistant at the Green Island school, where he remained for six years. On the 1st of April, 1889, he was appointed to his present position in Lawrence. He is a member of the Tuapeka branch of the New Zealand Educational Institute, and its secretary. Since 1890 he has been captain of the Lawrence High school cadets; the corps has a total strength of forty-five. Mr. Darton is a member of the Tuapeka Bowling Club, and was at one time its president.

Holy Trinity Church , Lawrence, is pleasantly situated in Whitehaven Street, and is the centre of the Tuapeka and Waitahuna parish, which extends from the centre, twenty miles in every direction. There are about 1500 adherents in the parish. In the early days services were held in the schoolroom and other places by the visiting clergy from Dunedin, but no church was erected till the advent of Archdeacon Beaumont in 1870, when the present building, which is of wood, and in the Gothic style, was erected at a cost of £500. It has seating accommodation for 200 persons, and has a pipe organ which cost £80. The Rev. Isaac Richards is vicar.

Holy Trinity Church, Lawrence.

Holy Trinity Church, Lawrence.

The Venerable Archdeacon George Pryce Beaumont , M.A. (Trinity College, Dublin), was born in Dublin, Ireland. He was ordained in 1858 as a curate at Monk Silver, Somersetshire, was afterwards chaplain to the Ebbw miners at Exmoor, and then incumbent at Witheil Florey, Somersetshire. Archdeacon Beaumont came out to the Colonies by the “Great Britain,” in 1866, and laboured as a missionary for four years on the West Coast. In 1870 he was appointed incumbent of Tuapeka and Waitahuna, and was afterwards made Archdeacon of Queenstown. On the 3rd of October, 1899, he resigned the incumbency of his parish, “simply and altogether,” he said, “for what he conceived to be its spiritual good, and from a conviction that a man in his position could be too long in one charge.” To himself personally his resignation meant a great pecuniary sacrifice; but he took the step in the belief that a new man, though he could not teach new truths, might be able to place the old truths in new aspects to the advantage of the people of the parish. Archdeacon Beaumont, in resigning his incumbency, did not resign the Archdeaconry of Queenstown, but retained it with a view to still giving what help he could to the general work of the church in the diocese.

The Presbyterian Church , Lawrence, occupies a commanding position in Colonsay Street. In the early days, services were held in a tent, and a tent also was used to accommodate the visiting clergy, amongst whom was the Rev. William Will, whose son, the Rev. J. A. Will, afterwards became pastor. The late Rev. Andrew Stobo, of Invercargill, was the first clergyman to officiate on the field, and lay brethren held services till 1865. Gabriel Read, the discover of the goldfield, was one of the first to contribute to the funds of the church, and he gave a subscription of £50. The first settled minister was the Rev. James Copeland, and he was followed successively by Messrs Cameron, Cowie, Fraser, Jolly, and the Rev. J. A. Will, who died about the middle of the year 1904. The church is a substantial red brick building, erected at a cost of £1,200, and has accommodation for 300 worshippers. There are 177 church members on the roll, and the Sunday school is well attended.

St. Patrick's Church , Lawrence, which, next to Dunedin, is the oldest church in the diocese, was founded by Father Moreau, who, at the outset of the goldfields, paid visits from Dunedin, and held services in a calico tent. Then an iron building was erected on a site purchased by Mr. John Donovan, and vested in Father Eccuyer, John Donovan and Bryan Sweeny as trustees. In 1870, Father Larkin erected the Gothic church, now used by the Dominican nuns as a school. From 1875 to 1880 Father Crowley was rector, and was succeeded by the present pastor, Dean O'Leary, in 1882. Four other churches of the parish were erected in 1869, and are still in existence; namely, Tokomairiro (at present a separate district), Waipori, Roxburgh and Waitahuna, and a fifth church was opened at Miller's Flat in July, 1899. The present Lawrence church is a fine Gothic built edifice in brick and Oamaru stone, with belfry of Oamaru stone, and was erected at a cost of £3,000. It measures 100 feet from the door to the back of the altar; 27 feet within the walls; 37 feet from floor to ceiling; transept, 52 feet. The windows are of stained glass, and there is seating accommodation for about 600 worshippers. There is a choir gallery directly over the main entrance. The presbytery and convent adjoin the church.

The Very Rev. Dean O'Leary , Administrator of the Tuapeka parish, was born in County Cork, in 1848. He received his education at St. Sulpice in France; St. Celeman's, Fermoy; and was ordained at St. John's, Waterford, Ireland. Dean O'Leary arrived in New Zealand in 1874, and was stationed successively at Oamaru, Dunedin, Invercargill, and again at Dunedin. He was appointed to the pastorship of Cromwell in 1880, and of Lawrence in 1882. The present church at Lawrence has been erected in Dean O'Leary's time. He has also purchased the site of the Waipori church, and paid for the page 686 transfer of the Manuherikia (Alexandra South) property from trustees to the Bishop; bought the Lawrence Convent grounds, with half an acre and two dwelling-houses erected thereon; and has always kept the school going at a cost of £240 per annum. In September, 1898, Dean O'Leary celebrated the twenty-fifth anniversary of his ordination, in honour of which religious services and special ceremonies were held in the presence of the Archbishop of Wellington, the Bishop of Dunedin and clergy of the diocese; and in token of the high esteem and appreciation of his untiring efforts and devotion in the cause of religion and education, his fellow clergy, and the people of the whole diocese presented him at the same time with a handsome illuminated address and a purse of 250 sovereigns to defray the cost of a trip to Ireland. The young ladies of Lawrence presented him with a travelling rug for himself and with another for his aged mother; the school children, a valuable carved inlaid table and chair, and an address; and the nuns at Lawrence with a set of altar vestments beautifully worked. Dean O Leary left in April, 1899, on his trip to his native land. He was appointed Dean of Central Otago at the Diocesan Synod in January, 1899.

Presbyterian Church, Lawrence.

Presbyterian Church, Lawrence.

Dean O'Leary.

Dean O'Leary.

The Wesleyan Church , Lawrence, is situated in Whitehaven Street, and is the principal chapel of the Lawrence circuit. The Wesleyans have the reputation of being the first settled denomination in Lawrence. In the early days services were held by lay preachers and by the Rev. Isaac Harding. The first church, a substantial brick one, was erected in Colonsay Street, but the site was exchanged for the present one about thirty years ago. The building is of wood, and accommodates about 150 worshippers. The Rev. W. Dawson is in charge.

Miss Mary Woods , only daughter of Mr. J. J. Woods, clerk to the Tuapeka County Council, was born at Lawrence, and studied under the Dominican nuns at Dunedin. She early showed a special aptitude for music, and became a pupil of Signor
Miss M. Woods: Taken In 1898.

Miss M. Woods: Taken In 1898.

page 687 Squarise (violin) and of Mr. A. J. Barth (piano). She has also studied voice production for several years, and promises to become an accomplished vocalist. Miss Woods has passed the Trinity College (London) examination with honours, and in 1898, when only seventeen years of age, she passed the senior practical musical examination (piano), in which she won the maximum number of marks of 100 per cent. She was then a pupil of the Dominican Nuns, Dunedin. This remarkable achievement won the special praise of the examiner, who stated that never out of London had such proficiency been shown. Miss Woods has obtained the musical degree of Associate of Trinity College, London, and since 1902 she has been engaged in professionally teaching music at Lawrence. In 1904 she went to London to study at the Royal Academy of Music.

The “Tuapeka Times” was founded early in the sixties. It was for some years the property of Messrs Thomson and Ferguson, but Mr. Ferguson subsequently became the sole proprietor. Then Messrs Pilling Bros. became the owners, and in 1896 the paper passed into the possession of the company which now owns it. It has a large circulation throughout the goldfields, and has been considerably enlarged by its present proprietors. In politics, the paper is independent.

Mr. John Norrie , the Manager of the “Tuapeka Times,” was born in Glasgow in 1861. He came to the Colony while very young, received his education at the Milton grammar school, and was afterwards apprenticed to the printing trade. Mr. Norrie was for many years foreman on the “Mataura Ensign” at Gore; he afterwards held a similar position on the “Waimea Plains Review,” and then became manager of the “Tuapeka Times.”

The Warden And Stipendiary Magistrate's Court , Lawrence, is conducted in a brick building, which also provides accommodation for the Survey Department, and stands on an elevated situation overlooking the town. The courts are presided over by Mr. R. S. Hawkins, S.M.

Mr. A. M. Eyes , Mining Registrar, Registrar of Births, Deaths and Marriages, and Clerk of the Stipendiary Magistrate's, Warden's and District Courts, Lawrence, was born in Marlborough, in 1855, and educated at Nelson College. He entered the public service at Blenheim as clerk in the Superintendent's office. Two years later he filled an appointment under the provincial government for a short time. Mr. Eyes was then appointed mining registrar at Stafford, on the West Coast, where he stayed for five years, and was afterwards chief clerk in the Official Assignee's office in Christchurch for four years. He was then transferred to Riverton as mining registrar and receiver, and six years later was appointed to his position in Lawrence. Mr. Eyes is married, and has two sons.

Crooke, Alfred , Barrister and Solicitor, Ross Place, Lawrence. Bankers, Bank of New Zealand. Private residence, Iona Street. Mr. Crooke was born in the year 1854, in Guildford, County of Surrey, England, where he received his early education. He proceeded to Queen's College, Cambridge, and graduated B.A. in 1878, and LL.M. in 1880. After studying for the legal profession, at the Middle Temple, he was called to the Bar in May, 1882. In October of the same year Mr. Crooke sailed for New Zealand, and arrived at Port Chalmers by the s.s. “Hauroto.” After practising for a short time in Dunedin, he settled in Lawrence. Mr. Crooke is solicitor to the Lawrence Borough Council, and to the Tuapeka County Council. He married, in 1890, a daughter of Mr. James Smith, of Greenfield, and has three daughters.

Mr. A. Crooke.

Mr. A. Crooke.

Mr. Frederick George Dalziell , Barrister and Solicitor, established a practice in Peel Street, Lawrence, in 1894. Mr. Dalziell was born in Auckland, in the year 1865, and was educated at New Plymouth. He studied for the profession in Dunedin, was admitted in 1892, and entered into partnership with Dr. Findlay, at Palmerston, Otago, under the style of Findlay and Dalziell. In 1894, he removed to Lawrence, where he practised on his own account, and was solicitor for several mining and dredging companies. He is now (1904) a partner in the firm of Findlay, Dalziell and Co., barristers and solicitors, Lambton Quay, Wellington.

Harrop, Mrs S. E. (Miss Bertha Harrop, manager), Chemist and Druggist, Bookseller and Stationer, Peel Street, Lawrence. This business was established in the year 1862, by the late Mr. J. Harrop, and since his death it has been conducted, on behalf of his widow, by his daughter, who is a duly qualified registered chemist and druggist.

Miss Bertha Harrop was born in Lawrence, where she was educated and learned the business with her father. She received a certificate from the Pharmacy Board of New Zealand in May, 1890.

Taylor, George Ormerod , Chemist and Druggist, Tuapeka Pharmacy, Ross Place, Lawrence. Bankers, Bank of New Zealand. This business has existed from the earliest days of settlement in Lawrence. The proprietor bought the old Colonial Bank, a two-storied brick building, which he altered to suit the purposes of his business. There is a large, well-fitted shop, and consulting-room at the front, and the rest of the building is devoted to residential purposes. Mr. Taylor is referred to elsewhere as an ex-mayor of Lawrence.

Arbuckle, John Carse , Auctioneer and General Merchant, and Proprietor of the Tuapeka Bazaar, Irvine Street, Lawrence. Bankers, Bank of New South Wales, Private address, Peel Street, Lawrence. Established 1865. Mr. Arbuckle's mart is close to the railway station, and has a large frontage, and floor storage amounting to about 10,000 cubic feet. The building is of stone, with facings of cement. Mr. Arbuckle receives consignments of fruit, furniture, and general produce, of which he holds periodical sales. He is referred to elsewhere as an ex-mayor of Lawrence.

Thompson, John , J.P., Stock and Land Agent and Auctioneer, Ross Place, Lawrence. Agent for the Australian Mutual Provident Society, Standard Fire and Marine Insurance Company, and Norwich Union Fire Insurance Company. Bankers, Bank of New Zealand. Private residence, Lancaster Street. The large business conducted by Mr. Thompson was established by Mr. Squires in 1875, and bought by Mr. Thompson in 1878. Mr. Thompson has considerably extended the connection, and now holds periodical auction sales at his yards, Lawrence, and clearing page 688 sales as required throughout the district. The premises consist of wooden buildings on freehold land in Ross Place, and a grain and wool store in iron on the opposite side of the street. Mr. Thompson is referred to elsewhere as a former member of the Lawrence Borough Council.

Miller And Donn (Alexander Miller and Christina Cormick Donn), General Drapers and Clothiers, Ross Place, Lawrence. This business was established by Mr. P. McFarlane in 1883, and was subsequently conducted by Mr. E. Dimaut from 1888 to 1898, when it was acquired by Mr. Miller and Miss Donn. The premises occupy an important corner section in Ross Place, and the business has drapery, millinery, clothing, matting and felting for goldmining, and furnishing departments. The firm's connection covers a wide area of country, with Lawrence as a centre. [After this article was first printed, the firm assigned its estate, though Miss Donn continued to be interested in the business.]

Mr. Alexander Miller was born in Edinburgh in 1858, and arrived with his parents in Port Chalmers in 1861, by the ship “Robert Henderson.” He was educated at the Waikari school, and was apprenticed to the drapery business with Messrs Herbert Haynes and Co., Dunedin. Mr. Miller worked at his trade in Dunedin, and at Sydney, Timaru, Balclutha and Kaitangata, and removed to Lawrence in 1891, when he became manager for Mr. W. T. Talboys. He remained in that position till he joined in the purchase of the business. Mr. Miller was a member of the committee of the Tuapeka Horticultural Society; and as a Freemason was attached to Lodge St. Thomas, Kilwinning, S.C. He was married, in October, 1896, to a daughter of Mr. J. Kitto, of Munro's Gully, and has one son and one daughter. After giving up business in Lawrence he went to Invercargill.

Miss Christina Cormick Donn was for some time in the employment of Mr. W. T. Talboys, and was in charge of the millinery department. She was previously with Messrs Clayton, Gardiner and Co., of Oamaru, and with Messrs A. and T. Inglis, Dunedin.

Browne Bros. (J. C. Browne and E. Browne), Timber and Coal Merchants, and Forwarding Agents, Irvine Street, Lawrence. Bankers, Bank of New Zealand.

Mr. J. C. Browne , the Senior Partner, is referred to elsewhere as a former Mayor of Lawrence.

Arthur, Thomas (Alexander Arthur, manager), General Merchant, Ross Place, Lawrence. Bankers, Bank of New Zealand. Private residence, Lancaster Street. This business was established in 1861, by the late Mr. Thomas Arthur. The premises are erected on freehold land, and consist of a substantial brick shop, of one storey, with a store and office at the back. The business has departments devoted to grocery, wines and spirits, and ironmongery.

Mr. Alexander Arthur has managed the business since the death of his father, in the interests of the widow and family, He was born at Lawrence in 1875, educated at the High School, and brought up to business by his father. Mr. Arthur is a member of the local athletic clubs.

Herbert and Co., Ltd. , Ross Place, Lawrence; branch at Waitahuna. Directors: Messrs A. McKinlay (chairman), W. G. McKinlay, and J. B. McKinlay. This is one of the oldest established businesses in Otago. It was started originally in Gabriel's Gully by Messrs A. McKinlay, J. F. Herbert, and E. Herbert, on the 4th of February, 1882. These gentlemen carried on the business under the name of Herbert and Co. In 1873 Mr. J. F. Herbert sold his interest to Messrs A. McKinlay and E. Herbert, who carried on the business till 31st of October, 1899, when Mr. A. McKinlay bought his partner's interest and turned the business into a limited liability company, trading as Herbert and Co., Ltd., seedsman, ironmongers, and general merchants. In April, 1903, the firm bought the business of Mr A. Garden, at Waitahuna, and established a branch at that place.

Mr. Archibald Mckinlay (Chairman of Directors of Herbert and Co., Limited), was born in Rothesay, Scotland, where he was educated and brought up to the drapery business. He came to Melbourne in the year 1853, and engaged in mining pursuits until the celebrated Gabriel's Gully “rush” of 1861, when he settled in the Lawrence district. Soon after his arrival he was joined by Mr. Herbert, and they started business under the name of Herbert and Co., general merchants. He was married, in August, 1868, to a daughter of the late Mr. A. Gilchrist, of Glasgow, and has four sons and three daughters.

Mr. A. McKinlay.

Mr. A. McKinlay.

Christie, David Lawrence , Flour and Oatmeal Miller, Lawrence Roller Flour Mills, Lawrence. Mr. Christie's fine mill was built in 1885, by the Tuapeka Milling Company, Ltd., who worked it till 1895. The building is of wood, and is four stories in height. The machinery is by Messrs Ganz and Co., and Schumacher, and is capable of turning out three tons of flour per day, and five tons of oatmeal. It is driven by a water wheel of about twenty horse-power, and there is an ample supply of water. Till 1898, the mill was known as a stone mill, but the rollers were put in in that year. The produce of the mill, with the well-known “Beehive” brand, is sold locally and in Dunedin, and occasionally it is shipped to the North Island. Mr. Christie was born in Aberdeen, Scotland, in 1857. His father and brothers were engaged in the milling business, and he learned his trade at Gordon's mill, in Aberdeen. He came to Port Chalmers by the ship “Nelson,” in 1883, worked at Anderson's mills at Woodhaugh, near Dunedin, and afterwards became manager for Messrs Hopkins and Jowitt, of Balclutha, before removing to Lawrence, where he settled in 1885, Since then Mr. Christie has been closely connected with the Lawrence mill, and acted as manager till 1895, when he became the proprietor. As a Freemason, he is attached to Lodge St. George, E.C. Mr. Christie is well known as a breeder of Pile game fowls, with which he has won the first prize at a number of shows. He was married, in 1880, to a daughter of Mr. J. Gordon, tailor, of Aberdeen, Scotland, and has four sons and five daughters.

Mr. And Mrs D. L. Christie.

Mr. And Mrs D. L. Christie.

Oudaille, Francis , J.P., General Storekeeper, Ross Place, Lawrence. Bankers, Bank of New Zealand. Private residence, Waitahuna. This business was established by the proprieter as a branch of the main business page 689 at Waitahuna, and has been conducted since 1861. The premises occupy a prominent position on a freehold section at the foot of Peel Street, and consist of a wooden store and office. Mr. Oudaille is further referred to as a member of the Tuapeka County Council.

Henry, Samuel , J.P., Sheepfarmer, Bellamy Station, Lawrence. Mr. Henry was born in County Tyrone, North of Ireland, in 1846, and emigrated to Melbourne in 1861, by the ship “Shalimahr,” but remained only about three months in Victoria, and then came on to Port Chalmers in the “Ocean Chief.” He was successful at Gabriel's Gully, to which he went at the time of the “rush.” Then he bought teams and was engaged in the carrying trade. For fifteen years he was in partnership with Mr. Cotton, of Waipori; and while still carrying on the forwarding business, he bought a run and also two hotels. At the dissolution of the partnership, Mr. Cotton took the hotels and some other property, and Mr. Henry retained possession of the run, which was then known at “Bowler's,” and is now his own private property. When Mr. Henry first lived on the run he was in the capacity of a stockman. He now depastures about 9000 sheep and 200 head of cattle. Mr. Henry was for two years chairman of the County Council, and for six one of its ordinary members. It was during his chairmanship that the construction of the new bridge at Miller's Flat was first started, and the work has since been completed. Mr. Henry is a Freemason, and also a member of the Foresters' Lodge at Lawrence. He married Miss Mary Agnes Slater, of Manchester, who came to the Colony in 1864, and they have a family of five daughters and three sons. On the 15th of May, 1903, Mr. and Mrs Henry left New Zealand by the steamship “Athenic,” on a year's visit to the Old Country.

Mr. S. Henry.

Mr. S. Henry.

Mr. William Sutherland Is a native of Dornoch, Sutherlandshire, Scotland, where he learned the trade of a tailor in his father's shop. He arrived in the Colony by the ship “Robert Henderson,” in the year 1861, and for a short time worked at his trade in Dunedin. He then removed to Milton, where he remained for a number of years in the employment of the late Mr. James Murray, tailor and clothier, of that town. In 1871, Mr. Sutherland decided to commence business on his own account, and selected Lawrence, then the scene of a good deal of mining activity, as a promising place in which to open out. His enterprise from the first proved successful, as he built up a remunerative business, and gave employment to a number of persons. He is now (1904) retired from business, but still resides in Lawrence. Mr. Sutherland is a Freemason, and is connected with Lodge St. George, 1128, E.C., in which he has passed through all the chairs. He is also a member of Loyal Pioneer Lodge of Oddfellows, in which he has held the position of treasurer since 1890. Mr. Sutherland was married in the year 1873, to a daughter of the late Mr. Alexander Ross, of Poles, Dornoch, Sutherlandshire, Scotland.

Mr. W. Sutherland's Residence.

Mr. W. Sutherland's Residence.