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The Cyclopedia of New Zealand [Otago & Southland Provincial Districts]

Milton

Milton.

Milton is a prosperous town, situated thirty-six miles south-west from Dunedin, on the main south line It dates from the year 1860, when Mr.
Milton In 1898.

Milton In 1898.

W. H. Mansford bought half an acre of land, and built a store, on the frontage of Elderlee, and twenty-five acres of land were subdivided by Mr. Peter McGill. Previous to this, Mr. McGill's flour mill had been in operation, where the present highly-improved mill stands. Under the impetus of the diggings, Milton made such progress that it was proclaimed an incorporated town in 1866, and a mayor and council were elected. The new local administration started the work of improvement, and in March, 1807, Milton was visited by the Governor, Sir George Grey. It has all along made steady progress, and is known as one of the cleanest and most complete towns in New Zealand. This is very much owing to its never having fallen into debt, and to its having all its means to expend on improvements. Milton now has about 1500 inhabitants, and the rates have never exceeded one shilling on the annual value to let. The town has many large and handsome public buildings, which include Presbyterian, Anglican, Roman Catholic, and Wesleyan churches; two public halls, one of which, the Coronation Hall, was erected at a cost of £3,500. Milton has woollen mills, flour mills, a brewery, a fellmongery, brick works, pottery works, and a bacon factory. It has also two banks, an agricultural and pastoral society, a bi-weekly newspaper, a post and telegraph office, and a courthouse. There are four hotels in the town Milton has a District High School, and there is a private school, under the supervision of the Dominican nuns. A large poultry farm has been for some time established in the neighbourhood by the Government. The roads around the town are level and excellent for cycling. The Tokomairiro river is well stocked with trout; and the neighbour-hoed affords rabbit-shooting for sportsmen.

Mr. John Crawford Anderson , ex-Member for Bruce, is the eldest son of Mr. Archibald Anderson, of the Hermitage, Stirling, and was born in Otago in 1848. He was educated at the Dunedin High school, and at the age of twenty leased from his father 2000 acres, which he changed from its virgin condition to a high state of cultivation, when it reverted to the lessor. Mr. Anderson then engaged in antimony mining at Waipori, and in quartz-reefing on the Carrick Itaages. In 1885, at the request of a large number of the electors of Bruce, he contested that seut against several other candidates, amongst whom was Mr. Donald Reid, junior, or Milton, who won by thirty-one votes. At the general election of 1887, Mr. Anderson contested the constituency again, and defeated his former opponent by thirty-one votes, the precise majority which Mr. Itaid had had in 1885. Mr. Anderson did not contest the seat at the next election, and has over since been engaged in farming at Inehelutha.

The Borough Of Milton bas an area of 264 acres, and a population of 1,500 persona, 340 of whom arc ratepayers. The rateable value is £7,800, with a general rate of two shillings in the pound; the annual revenue, £1,000. The town is lighted with kerosene, and many of the public buildings and business establishments by acetelyne gas. Water is obtained from spring wells and rain water. Members of the Council for 1904: Mr. William Moore (Mayor), and Messrs James Lockhart, Frederick Bastings, William Taylor, Robert Robertson, James B. Scanlan, William Murphy, Charles King, Archibald McKechnie, and Charles Grey (Councillors), Mr. B. M. Brookes is Town Clerk. The Council holds its meeting in the Coronation Hall.

His Worship The Mayor, Mr. William Moore , is a native of County Derry, Ireland, where he was born in 1848. He was educated in his native place, and served an apprenticeship as a storekeeper. In 1868 he came to New Zealand in tin ship “E. P. Boxiverie,” and landed at Port Chalmers. Mr. Moore went at once to Milton, and was engaged with Mr. James Adam, of Bon Accord farm, for twelve months, and for a subsequent period of three years he worked for Captain Scott in the same district. In 1872, Mr. Mtoore started in business with Mr. H. H. Marryatt, under the style of Marryatt and Moore, storekeepers. Pour years later this partnership was dissolved, and Mr. Moore singly carried on the store until 1684, when he bought the business of the late Mr. Peter page 663 Cunningham, storekeeper, Milton, and has ever since successfully conducted it. In 1885, Mr. Moore was elected a member of the Milton Borough Council, and two years
Mr. W. Moore.

Mr. W. Moore.

later was returned as mayor, and occupied the office for three successive years. When Mr. D. Reid went to England on a trip, Mr. Moore was elected as Acting-Mayor of Milton, and at the following annual election he was again returned, and still holds the position. For many years he; has been a member of the Milton school committee, for which he was for seven years secretary, and has been nine years chairman. Mr. Moore is on the committee of the Tokomairiro Farmers' Club, and is chairman of the Domam Board. He was one of the founders of the Bruce Woollen Mills, and has been chairman of directors since the Company's inception. Ever ready to take an active part in local affairs, Mr. Moore, by his kindly nature, has justly won the esteem of his fellow townsmen, and in social matters always displays a keen interest. He has been president of the Milton Cale-donian Society, and is a Freemason; he is a Past Master of Lodge St. John, 461, Scottish Constitution. Mr. Moore married a daughter of the late Mr. Edward Martin, of Money more farm, in 1879; and they have a family of three sons and two daughters.
Councillor Frederick Bastings , once Mayor of Milton, has resided in the borough since 1873. He is landlord of the White Horse Hotel, one of the oldest hostelries in the district. Mr. Bastings is known throughout Otago as one of the most versatile amateur comedians, that has ever appeared upon the boards of the province. He is an excellent ventriloquist and an inimitable mimic. His services and talents have always boon given in the cause of charity, and a local entertainment without his assistance would be like fish without sauce. Hr. Bastings is the fifth son of Mr. W. Bastings, late of Northcote, Victoria, and was born in Islington,
Councillor F. Bastings.

Councillor F. Bastings.

London, in 1843. Accompanied by his father and brothers, he arrived in Victoria by the ship “Slams Castle,” Captain Andrews, in 1851. He was educated at the Model National Training school, Melbourne, and at the early ago of nineteen, he arrived in Otago, during
St. John's Church, Milton.

St. John's Church, Milton.

the great gold “rash” at Gabriel's Gully. Mr. Bastings followed the occupation of miner at Queenstown and the Arrow, and subsequently revisited Victoria. He eventually returned to New Zealand, and became successively proprietor of the Commercial Hotel, Lawrence, and the Kaiwanra Hotel, Cromwell, and in 1873 he became landlord of the White Horse Hotel, Milton. Mr. Bastings has been a member of the Domain Board, is an ex-chairman of the school and Athenæum committees, and is president and secretary of the Bowling Club. He is a Freemason and an ex-officer of Lodge St. John, 461, S.C., Milton. In 1868, he was married to Miss Vickory, of Victoria.
Councillor Charles King , who has for various terms occupied a seat on the Milton Borough Council, is the eldest son of Mr. John King (late Inspector of Permanent Way, in. the employment of the Great Eastern Railway Company), and was born in, Hertfordshire, England, in 1818. He was educated at Stratford, near London, whore he learnt the trade of a plumber and afterwards worked as journeyman for two railway companies, namely, the Loadon-Tilbury and South End, and Great Eastern. In 1874 Mr. King emigrated to Otago by the ship “Buckinghamshire,” and worked at his trade in Dunedin and Milton for nearly two years. In the course of time he entered business on his own account at Milton, where he still carries cm a successful trade, Mr. King erected the plant for the Milton and Stirling dairy factories, and carried out the plumbing contracts in connection with the Milton Presbyterian church, flour and woollen mills, etc. He has taken a prominent part in furthering page 664 the cause of musical knowledge in the district, and was choirmaster in the Wesleyan church for a number of years, and the originator and conductor of the first Orchestral
Councillor C. King.

Councillor C. King.

Society; and is now bandmaster of the Milton brass bund, which has distinguished itself at several interprovincial contests. Mr. King is, however, more popularly known throughout the districts of Tokomairiro, Cintha and Kailangata, as the possessor of an excellent tenor voice, which is often heard at local concerts. He has been twice married; his first wife was Miss Caroline Cistle, and his second wife is a daughter of Mr. Thomas Holt, fellmonger, late of Milton, but now residing at Oamaru.
Councillor James Scanlan , who was twice successively Mayor of Milton, is an old Australian and New Zealand gold seeker. He was born in the County of Limerick, Ireland, in 1838, and is the youngest son of Mr. Patrick Bcanian, fanner, of Loughill. He was educated at the Mount Trenehard national school, and afterwards worked on his father's farm until 1861, when he emigrated to Melbourne by the ship “Red Jacket. Mr. Scanlan was mining at the Jordan diggings and at Walahalla, in Gippsland, where at first he was very successful, but, as with thousands of others, his luck deserted him. About 1866 he came over to Hokitika, and became interested in the Auckland Lead Claim, which proved very rich. He afterwards proceeded to the Orepuki “rush,” in Southland, but did not meet with great success. Mr. Scanlan settled in Milton in 1869. He worked on Miller's Flat, but eventually started in business as a wool scourer and follmouger with Mr. John Tobin. Ere long Mr. Scanlan became sole proprietor, and he bus continued to follow the occupation. Mr. Scanlan revisited Ireland and England in 1886, and in 1891 he made a trip to Victoria and New South Wales, Upon his return to the Tokomairiro district, he commenced farming in the neighbourhood of Fairfax, and also acquired the Louisville Grange and Helensbrook farms, which he works in conjunction with his occupation of wool buyer, etc, Mr. Scanlan is a large shipper of wool to London, and during 1898 he shipped 600 bales from Dunedin and Milton, Besides taking an active interest in municipal affairs, Mr. Scanlan has also identified himself with the woollen and pottery industries of Milton. He was a shareholder in the Milton pottery, and is a director of the nowly established woollen mill, which has proved a pronotiseed
Councillor J. Scaklan.

Councillor J. Scaklan.

success, and a direct benefit to the residents of Tokomatriro district In 1878 Mr. Scanlan married Mary, daughter of Mr. Keogh, County Kilkenny, Ireland, and their offspring consists of four sons and one daughter.

Mr. Robert Margrie Brookes , Town Clerk, Treasurer, and Returning Officer for the Borough of Milton, was born in the Tokouiairiro district in the year 1864. He is the youngest son of Mr. Thomas Brookes, who was town clerk of Milton until his death in December, 1886, and was succeeded by his son, the present occupant of the office. Mr. K. M. Brookes was educated at the Toko mairiro High School under the late rector, Mr. William Malcolm, and the present rector, Mr. James Reid. He is an enthusiastic musician, and was for four years honorary conductor of the Milton Brass Band. Mr. Brookes is also secretary of the Tokomairiro Athenæum and clerk to the Tokomairiro Domain Board, and has been Right Worshipful Master of St. John's Masonic Lodge, Scottish Constitution.

The County Of Brude is bounded on the north by the Taieri and Waipori rivers, and on the south by the river Clutha. Within it are the boroughs of Milton and Kaitangata, and it has an area of about 230,000 acres. The district was one of the first settled in Otago, and the greater part of the land is in small holdings. Mineral wealth abounds, as well as rich soil. The Kaitangata coal mine is within the county, and so are the Millbum lime works. Iron stone has been found in the Table Hill district, and gold dredges work on the Tokomairiro river. There are potteries and brick kilns, and woollen mills within the county, of which Mr. Henry Clark was chairman from the inception of the Counties Act of 1877 until he resigned on the 4th of November, 1902; and Mr. Alexander Nelson has from the first held office as county clerk and inspector of works.

The Bruce County Council controls the finances of the districts of Balmoral, Clarendon, Waihola, Tokomairiro, Glenledi, Kaitangata, Crichton, and Matau, which cover and area of 503 square miles. There is a population of 4,762, and 1,021 are ratepayers. The total capital value amounts to £1,055,823, and the unimproved value is £977,703. There are 1,156 rateable properties. The rates vary in the several ridings and amount to one penny, three-fourths, three-eighths, three-sixteenths, and one-twelfth of a penny in the pound. The Council meets at its office, in Milton, on the first Tuesday of the month, at 11 a.m.; but the office, in charge of the assistant clerk, is open every day in the week for the despatch of ordinary husmega, Mr. Nelson, clerk and engineer, attends at the office every Tuesday and Friday. Members for 1904: Mr. Peter Haggart (chairman), and Messrs John M. Begg, David Bryce, William Noble, Joseph Mosley, John Adam, George T. Martin, and James Crane. Mr. Alexander Nelson is clerk page 665 and engineer, and Mr. Gilbert Scott assistant clerk.

Mr. Alexander Nelson , J.P., Clerk and Engineer to the Bruce. County Council, resides at Loveli's Flat. He is the eldest son of Mr. James Nelson, who was formerly connected
Mr. A. Nelson.

Mr. A. Nelson.

with the great firm of Holdsworth Bros. and Co., iron and colliery proprietors, Lanarkshire, Scotland, and was born in Wishaw, Lanarkshire, in 1840. Mr. Nelson was educated partly at a private school, and partly at the schools established by the Holdsworth Bros.' firm, which supplied means for the further education of their employees. Mr. Nelson sailed from London, by the barque “Geelong” (Captain Wallace), and after a voyage which occupied 139 days, he arrived at Port Chalmers in 1862. He settled in the Tokomairiro district, and purchased a furm at Lovell's Flat, and also engaged in road contracting. For some years he held the appointment of clerk and inspector to various road boards, and on the formation of the counties in 1877 he was transferred to his present position, Mr. Nelson was married, in 1888, to a daughter of Mr. Adam Pringle, of Whitburn, Linlithgow, Scotland, and has one son and three daughters. He is session clerk of the Lovell's Flat church, and was made a Justice of the Peace in 1897.
Mr. Robert Murray , J. P., formerly a Member of the Bruce County Council and sometime a member of the Otago Provincial Council, is one of the oldest settlers residing in the Tokomairiro district. He was born in 1820, at his fathers homestead, near Dornoch, the county town of Sutherlandshire. Mr. Murray was brought up a carpenter, and followed his trade in England and Scotland. In 1819 he arrived at Port Chalmers by the barque “Cornwall,” Captain William Dawson, from London. The vessel did not some direct to its final destination, but called at New Plymouth and “Wellington, in order to land passengers, etc. The medical superintendent of the ship was Dr. Donald, who after wards settled at Lyttelton. Mr. Murray worked at his trade at Dunedin, and in the Taieri and Tokomairiro districts until 1855, when he purchased one of the first sections of land at Clarksville under the land regulations of the Otago Provincial Government, which sold these sections at the upset price of 10s per acre, on the condition that the purchaser should spend £2 per acre in improvements, within a period of two years of purchase. Mr. Murray subsequently increased his area to 600 acres, which he farmed till 1895, when he disposed of his land and acquired a smaller property adjacent to the township of Milton, where he is now renting after a long and honourable career as a pioneer setter. As early as 1866 he was elected a member of the Otago Provincial Council, in which he sat for four years. He became a member of the Bruce County Council in 1878, and was a member of the Tokomairiro Road Board for several years; and he was elected one of the first members of the local school committee under, the Otago Education Act of 1856. For a number of years he acted as an elder of the Milton Presbyterian church, and was on the building committee during the erection of the first and second buildings, which have been superseded by the present beautiful church, which is an ornament to the township of Milton and a credit to the congregation and to the architect (Mr. Lawson.) Mr. Murray was married in
Mr. R. Murray.

Mr. R. Murray.

1862 to Miss Mary Esson, of Aberdeenshire, Scotland, and three sons were born of the marriage. Mrs. Murray died in 1870, and in 1877 Mr. Murray married Miss Mary Jamieson.

Post And Telegraph Office , Milton. In the early days of Milton and Toko-mairiro, the postal service was carried on under the supervision of a local storekeeper, and this state of things existed until about 1868, when a somewhat unsightly and primitive building was erected; and became neither ornamental to the town, nor creditable to the Postal Department. The office was opened under the charge of Mr. James Ferguson, who was succeeded by Mr. Frank Teesdale and Mr. R. C. Black; and Mr. Black was succeeded in August, 1904, by Mr M. J. Staunton.

Mr. Michael John Staunton , Postmaster, and Registrar of Births, Deaths and Marriages at Milton, was born in Victoria in 1856. He arrived in Dunedin with his parents in 1863, was educated in that city, and became a cadet in the training gallery of the post office at Wellington in November, 1872. After three months' service he was transferred to Cromwell, where he remained one year. He was then telegraphist at Mosgiel for five years, was subsequently stationed at Timaru, Dunedin and the Bluff, Clyde, Manaia, and Waipawa, whence he was promoted to Milton, where he took charge on the 16th of August, 1904. Mr. Staunton was president of the Clyde Sports Club and did duty as handicapper and starter, and was also president of the Vincent County Cycling Club.

Mr. Robert Charles Black , formerly Postmaster, Registrar of Births, Marriages, and Deaths at Milton, joined the service of the Great Westorn Railway Company at London, in 1865, and the General Post Office in 1869, and when the Government purchased the English Telegraph Companies in 1870, Mr. Black was transferred to that department. He arrived, in 1872, at Wellington, where he joined the page 666 New Zealand Government telegraph service, and was appointed to the cable station at White's Bay, Marlborough, where he remained until the staff was removed to the Blenheim office, where he remained for seven years. Mr. Black was then promoted to Greytown, Wairarapa, where he continued for fifteen years. He was subsequently stationed at Riverton for two years, and in 1897, he took charge at Milton. In August, 1904, he was transferred to Dannevirke in the Hawke's Bay district of the North Island. Mr. Black was born in 1851, at Invergordon, Cromarty, Scotland, and educated in London. In 1876, he was married to a daughter of Mr. James Tait, of Blenheim, and they have a family of six children.

Milton Railway Station . This station was opened for traffic on the 1st of September, 1875, under the charge of Mr. James Gibb, who long held the time record as an officer-in-charge in the provincial district of Otago. The station is second-grade, and possesses the usual public offices, waiting-rooms, store-rooms, etc. The goods shed has appliances for loading and unloading five trucks at a time, and it and the engine sheds are well adapted for the requirements of the traffic. Oatmeal, flour, wool, pottery, grain, stock, and dairy produce constitute the outgoing traffic, and the incoming goods comprise coal, lime, and general merchndise. The traffic of goods and passengers is very large at this station, and it is the depot for despatching and receiving freight and passengers for the Lawrence branch. Since the station was opened the general traffic has quadrupled itself; the yards have had to be extended and altered, and an overhead bridge has been erected for the convenience of foot passengers. A windmill and two hot-air engines are used for supplying the necessary water for the engines, etc. The present staff consists of the stationmaster, a clerk, a cadet, and three porters. Mr. Henry Pearce is the stationmaster.

Mr. James Gibb , formerly Stationmaster at Milton, is the youngest son of the late Mr. George Gibb, farm manager, and was born at Broxburn, in the parish of Uphall, Linlithgowshire, Scotland, in 1833. In 1856, Mr. Gibb joined the service of the Edinburgh and Glasgow Railway Company, with which he remained until that company amalgamated with the North British Railway Company, in the service of which he continued until 1872. He came to Port Chalmers by the ship “Margaret Galbraith.” Mr. Gibb accepted employment under the New Zealand Railway Department in 1875. He was appointed first stationmaster at Milton, and held the position with credit and satisfaction to all concerned until he retired from the service. He now resides in Dunedin. In 1889, Mr. Gibb was married at Dalkeith, Scotland, to a daughter of Mr. Wells, merchant, of Monte Video, South America. Their family consists of four surviving children.

Mr. J. Gibb.

Mr. J. Gibb.

Mr. Duncan Edward Chisholm , formerly Inspector of Permanent Way, New Zealand Railways, at Milton, became associated with the Public Works Department and New Zealand Railways in 1871. He was born in 1836, at Glenurquhart, in the picturesque and historic county of Inverness, in Scotland. After leaving school, Mr. Chisholm was apprenticed to the trade of carpenter and joiner, and worked at that calling in Scotland until 1860, when he sailed for Port Chalmers by the ship “Storm Cloud.” Shortly after arrival he settled in the Tokomairiro district, where he followed the trade of builder and miner. He was one of those who took up the second claim at Gabriel's Gully, and it proved a good one. In the year 1872, he accepted an appointment with the Public Works Department, and became inspector over the contract of Messrs Brogden and Sons for the construction of the Tokomairiro section. When the line was opened for traffic in 1875, he joined the New Zealand Railway Department, and was appointed Inspector of Permanent Way at Milton—a position which he filled with success. About 1863, Mr. Chisholm was married to Elsie, daughter of Mr. James Grant, Craiggon, Granton, Inverness-shire. He has now retired from the public service, but still (1904) resides at Milton.

Tokomairiro District High School. In the provincial days a grammar school was established at Tokomairiro, and was conducted first by Mr. Ross, and afterwards by Mr. Malcolm. It was during Mr. Malcolm's time that the erection of the present fine stone building was begun. The school was opened in March, 1880, by members of the Education Board and Professors Black and Shand, of the Otago University. From the first the new school has been under Mr. Reid's charge. There is a department for woodwork, and another for agricultural chemistry under the Technical Education Act. In the infant department, kindergarten training has been carried on for several years by the matron, Miss McLaren. The school has about 300 pupils, about fifty of whom attend the upper classes, from which year by year members matriculate and find their way into the professions. Tokomairiro district high school has also supplied a large number of pupils to the mining school in Dunedin. The present staff consists of Mr. James Reid (rector), Mr. Parker McKinlay (first assistant), Miss McLaren (matron), and four other teachers—three females, and one male.

page 667
Mr. James Reid , Rector of the Tokomairiro District High School, was born in Carmyllie, Forfarshire, in 1838. He received his early education at a side school near his native parish, and obtained such other instruction as enabled him to take up the work of teaching at the High School of Arbroath, to which he walked every day a distance of about seven miles. When nineteen years of age he was appointed teacher to a school in his native parish, of which the Rev. John Gow, formerly of St. Andrew's, Dunedin, and now of Opotiki, Bay of Plenty, was the pastor, and from whom, during the three years he taught this school, he received much kindness and weekly lessons that enabled him to take a Queen's scholarship at Moray House Training School, Edinburgh. After being in training there for over two years and receiving his Government certificate as a trained teacher, he became master of the school at weed-mouth, North of England, where he remained for about three years. Returning to Edinburgh, he taught for over two years in one of Dr. Begg's schools, from which, by the appointment of Mr. Graham, then acting rector of Moray House Training College, and Dr. Morrison, of the Training College, Glasgow, he came out to New Zealand to be first assistant under Mr. McRae, of the High School, Auckland. He landed in Auckland in June, 1865, and took up his duties. After teaching in Auckland for three years and six months, his voice failed him, and he went to the Thames goldfield, then just opened, and, having acquired a knowledge of gold amalgamation, was appointed battery manager to the Whau Goldmining Company. Mrs. Reid, a daughter of Mr. William Swanson, merchant of Thurso, to whom he had been married in Auckland, accompanied him to the Thames, along with their two children, Bessie, now Mrs. Smith, of the Bush, Stirling, and James,
Mr. And Mrs J. Reid.

Mr. And Mrs J. Reid.

at present minister at Waitahuna, and roughed it by living in tents and huts on the upper Moanataiari. After being three years on the Thames, Mr. Reid, under the advice of the late Dr. John Hislop, removed to Otago in January, 1871, purposing again to take up his profession as a teacher. He was teacher at Taieri Beach school for six months, at Waihola for about three years, and at North East Valley for five years and six months. During his stay at the North East Valley, he had the opportunity of attending classes in the evening at the University, particularly those under Dr. Black and Dr. Shand, and so obtained the more efficient equipment for the position he now holds. In January, 1880, under the recommendation of Inspector Petrie, Mr. Reid was appointed rector of the Tokomairiro District High School, and has now filled the position for twenty-four years. Being of a mechanical turn, and having gained a considerable knowledge of chemistry, Mr. Reid started classes in woodwork and agricultural chemistry in 1885, and has the credit of being the first in Otago, if not in New Zealand, to open technical classes in connection with the Government schools.
Mr. Parker Mckinlay , M. A., First Assistant Master of the Tokomairiro District High School, was born at Inchclutha, in 1873. He was educated at Stirling public school, where he afterwards served a pupil teachership of four years, and he studied for two years at the Normal Training College, Dunedin, where he took a D certificate with special mention in six subjects. Mr. McKinlay was a student at the Otago University for four years, and gained his B. A. degree in 1895, together with a scholarship in physical science, and took his M. A. with second-class honours in electricity and magnetism in the following year. He was appointed to the Port Chalmers school as third assistant master in 1896, and two years later received the appointment of First Assistant Master in the Oamaru Middle School, whence, after three years' efficient service, he was promoted to his present position. Mr. McKinlay takes a keen interest in the school games, and is an enthusiastic officer in the Cadet Corps. He is now classified A2.
Mr. W. F. Watters , B. A., formerly First Assistant of the Tokomairiro High School, and now (1904) First Assistant at Morning ton, Dunedin, was born at Pigeon Bay, Banks Peninsula, Canterbury, on the 22nd of June, 1868. He was educated at the Oamaru Grammar school and the Oamaru South school, and at the Dunedin High School, where he held junior and senior Education Board scholarships from 1881 to 1885. He matriculated in 1885, and attended the Otago University from 1887 to 1890, when he gained his B. A. degree. Mr. Watters became a pupil teacher at Kensington public school in 1887, and continued there till 1890. He was appointed second assistant in the Oamaru South school in 1891, and was there till 1896, when he was appointed first assistant in the Tokomairiro district high school. Mr. Watters was lieutenant in the Bruce Rifles, and honorary secretary of the South Otago Cricket Association. He was married on the 24th of January, 1894, to Kate, daughter of Mr. William Hannah, Maitland Street, Dunedin, and they have two children.

The Fairfax District School was erected in 1875, and stands on six acres of land in the Government township of Fairfax, about a mile from Milton. The building, which is of wood, is divided into two lofty, classrooms, well-lighted, heated, and ventilated. page 668 There is a large playground, and a substantial residence for the headmaster. The school has an average attendance of ninety. Mr. C. Mahoney is head-master and Miss Ethel Murray, mistress.

Mr. C. Mahoney , Headmaster of the Fairfax district school, was born in Victoria, Australia. He was trained for his profession, and with several other teachers came over to New Zealand in 1879. On his arrival he was appointed first assistant at the Riverton school, where he remained for two years and a half, before becoming assistant master at the Milton High School. After holding that position for eleven years, Mr. Mahoney was promoted to first assistant of the Green Island school, but two years later he gave up his profession for a time, to take up a new line of work. However, in 1894, he returned to teaching, and after two years at the Pine Hill school, was appointed to his present position at Fairfax. Mr. Mahoney is a member of the St. John's Lodge of Freemasons, No. 401. Scottish Constitution, Milton. He has taken an active part in volunteering, and has held a comission as captain of the Green Island corps; and is at present captain of the Fairfax School Cadet Corps. Mr. Mahoney was married, in 1884, to a daughter of the late Rev. Andrew Bett, of Mornington, Dunedin, and has, surviving, a family of five sons and four daughters.

The Catholic Parish Of Milton , which has been in existence for about thirty-one years, includes Waihola, Balclutha, and Owaka; at each of these places there is a church free from debt; and a new church is being (1904) erected at Kaitangata. From the time of the Gabriel's Gully rush until the appointment of Bishop Moran, Milton was visited by a priest from Lawrence, but about 1868 a wooden church was erected, which was replaced by a brick building in 1892; and a substantial brick presbytery was built in 1885. The Dominican nuns were introduced in 1891, and occupied what had been a private residence in the extensive grounds purchased for them, until a new brick convent was opened for them in 1901. When the present rector was appointed, in 1884, only the site of the presbytery belonged to the Catholic body, but now the church owns property, valued at £6,000, in the parish.

The Rev. Father O'Neil , Priest in charge of the parish of Milton, was born in Limerick, Ireland, and came to New Zealand in 1881. He was the first priest ordained by Bishop Moran in the diocese of Dunedin, and took charge of the parish of Milton in 1884.

The Tokomairiro Farmers' Club has been in existence since 1866, but even prior to that period, the resident farmers used to meet for the purpose of discussing agricultural subjects, arranging ploughing matches, and otherwise helping each other. The original promoters included Messrs George Lindsay, James Inglis, Robert Murray, William Tweedie, James Drinna, David Paton, James Goodall, John Hislop, J. L. Gillies, William Gray, J. M. Bryce, and John Macfarlane. The first president was Mr. John Dewe, sometime Resident Magistrate at Milton, and afterwards a minister of the Anglican Church. He died, in harness, some years ago. The office of secretary has been filled successively by Messrs Thomas Muir, John Church, J. S. Fleming, J. A. Henderson, J. C. Gordon, James Inglis, Alexander Campbell, David Tweedie, and again by Alexander Campbell. Meetings are held every month at Milton; the membership is increasing, and the club is in a flourishing condition.

The Late Mr. E. Martin And Mrs Martin.

The Late Mr. E. Martin And Mrs Martin.

Mr. George Thomas Martin , formerly President of the Tokomairiro Farmers' Club, is the fifth son of one of the pioneers of the Tokomai iro district, and was born in 1867, and educated at the Milton High School. He assisted his father until the death of the latter, and then he and his youngest brother succeeded to the Moneymore Estate at South-bridge. Mr. Martin was president of the Tokomairiro Farmers' Club from 1896 to 1898. While he was president, the Bruce County, under his management, carried off first honours at the Dunedin winter show, for the best and most comprehensive collections of farm and dairy produce, exhibited by any one county. He is now (1904) a member of Bruce County Council.
Morrison, Thomas L. Borland , Music Teacher, Milton. Mr. Morrison was born in Symington, Ayrshire, Scotland, in 1861. When about five years of age he began to study music, and studied the tonic sol-fa system under Mr. Harvey, choirmaster of the United Presbyterian Church, Kilmarnock, and finished under Professor Miller, of Glasgow. He studied the violin under Mr. McAlpine and Messrs Jukes and Cole, of Glasgow; the banjo and guitar under Mr. Jukes, and the piano under Mr. Robertson, organist to Mr. Holdsworth Coodham. His secular education was carried on at the Glasgow Free Church Normal school and the Glasgow University. In 1886, on account of ill-health, Mr. Morrison came to New Zealand and taught music in Dunedin for two years. He then took an appointment under the Wellington Education Board, but after a year returned to Dunedin, and then went to Alexandra South, where he formed the Alexandra Orchestral Society of twenty members, now in a flourishing condition. page 669 For some time he resided at Roxburgh, where he formed the Roxburgh Orchestral Society of twenty-five members, and then removed to Lawrence. In Lawrence he formed the Brass Band, which now has about thirty-five performing members, and also the Orchestral Society of twenty-seven members. Mr. Morrison teaches the piano, violin, mandoline, banjo, guitar and singing. As a teacher he has been eminently successful, having a large practice, and many of his former pupils are now teaching at Gore, Alexandra, Lawrence and other places.

Stipendiary Magistrate's Court , Milton. About 1862 the Provincial Government of Otago erected a courthouse and police barracks on the site of the High School, but in 1893 the present handsome brick building was erected. The first Resident Magistrate was Mr. Musgrave, who was succeeded by Mr. John Dewe. Then came Mr. J. P. Maitland, afterwards Commissioner of Crown Lands for Otago, and then Mr. Carew, who, later on, became Resident Magistrate at Dunedin, where he interpreted law and administered justice till shortly before his death, which took place on Sunday, the 28th of August, 1904. Milton is now included in the district served by Mr. R. S. Hawkins, S. M., who has his headquarters at Lawrence.

Reid, Donald , Solicitor, Milton. Mr. Reid is the eldest son of the late Mr. Charles Reid, one of the pioneer settlers of Otago, and he has identified himself all round with the life of the community since he commenced to practise in Milton in 1874. In 1885, he successfully contested the Bruce seat against Messrs Crawford Anderson, James McDonald and William Hutchison, but was defeated at the next election by Mr. Anderson. Mr. Reid was first elected mayor of Milton in 1879, and occupied the position for two successive years. He was elected again in 1894, and held the position till 1898, when, he visited England. Mr. Reid, who was an enthusiastic volunteer and a crack rifle shot, commanded the Bruce Rifles for several years, and he now holds the long service and imperial medals. He was married, in 1885, to Alice, daughter of Mr.
One Of The First Dwellings Erected In Milton. Built During The Fifties For The Late Mrs Reid.

One Of The First Dwellings Erected In Milton. Built During The Fifties For The Late Mrs Reid.

Francis C. Fulton, late of Napier, Hawke's Bay. Prior to leaving Milton for Europe, the burgesses and settlers of the district entertained Mr. Reid at a public banquet, at which they presented him with an illuminated address and a handsome travelling bag, as tokens of the esteem in which he was held by all classes of the community.

Sutherland, James , M.B., Ch. (Edin.), Milton. Dr. Sutherland was born at Lochend, East Taieri, and is the youngest son of the late Mr. John Sutherland, who arrived in Otago early in 1851. He was educated at the Dunedin High school and Otago University. He graduated at Edinburgh University, and practised in Cumberland, England, and at West Calder in Midlothian, Scotland, before returning to New Zealand. Dr. Sutherland commenced practice at Milton in December, 1893. In 1898 he was elected a member of the Milton Borough Council, and surgeon to the local lodge of Oddfellows, and in 1899 surgeon to the natives at Henley, etc. He is a member of Lodge St. John, 461, Scottish Constitution.

The National Bank Of New Zealand, Ltd. , Union Street, Milton. The bank building is one storey in height, built of brick, and contains the usual offices and strong room, the public office being one of the largest in any country bank in Otago. The staff consists of the manager, accountant, ledger-keeper, and junior clerk. The branch is equipped with a complete gold melting and assay plant and is the receiving office of the National Bank for the Otago goldfields.

Mr. James William Petrie , Manager of the National Bank of New Zealand, Ltd., Milton, was born at Kaitangata in 1866, and was educated at Balclutha. After spending about eighteen months on his father's farm at Stirling, he entered the service of the Bank at Balclutha in March, 1883. Four page 670 years later he was transferred to Oamaru, where he was ledger-keeper for two years and a half. After about eighteen months in various parts of Otago, he was appointed accountant at Invercargill, and in February, 1893, became manager at Milton. In 1887 Mr. Petrie passed with credit the Senior Examination of the Bankers' Institute of Australasia, and received the Associates' diploma. He also holds a certificate in assaying, which he studied at the Otago School of Mines. Mr. Petrie was married in November, 1893, to the only daughter of the Rev. J. M. Allan, of Stirling, and has one son and two daughters.

Dickson, John , Builder and Undertaker, Union Street, Milton. Bankers, Bank of New Zealand. This large and thriving business was originally established in 1862 by Mr. James Dickson, who retired into private life in 1886. The business is now owned and carried on by Mr. John Dickson, the eldest son of the founder. He was born in Edinburgh in 1846, and educated in Melbourne, where he was apprenticed to his father, and also acquired a knowledge of architecture under Mr. Taylor, of that city. Mr. John Dickson claims to be one of the oldest volunteers in Otago, as he joined in the year 1864, and only resigned his position of colour-sergeant and secretary of the Bruce Rifles in 1897. During the whole period of thirty-three years, he never missed active duty, and earned the long-service and Imperial medals. Mr. Dickson is a prominent member of the Ancient Order of Foresters, and is permanent secretary of Court Bruce, 4526. He was married, in 1875, to Jane, daughter of Mr. Burr, of Castlemaine, Victoria, and has three sons and three daughters.

Johnstone, Francis Grant , Cabinet-maker. Union and Ossian Streets, Milton. Bankers, Bank of New Zealand. Established in 1865. Mr. Johnstone has succeeded in building a most prosperous and successful business, which has extended over a period of thirty-nine years. The show-room, which faces Union street, is 40 feet by 20 feet, and contains varied specimens of the excellent work done at the establishment. The workshop is conveniently attached at the rear of the main building, and is fitted up with a plant of wood-working machinery, including circular saws, turning lathe, tennoning machine, etc. Before the railway line was completed from Dunedin to Milton, Mr. Johnstone used to employ a greater number of skilled mechanics than he does at the present time; but, notwithstanding the fact that certain persons purchase their furniture in Dunedin, with a view to cheapness, Mr. Johnstone has the satisfaction of knowing that in many cases it is his own wares which are returning to the place where they were manufactured for firms in Dunedin; in any case, he still commands the bulk of the trade in the Tokomairiro district. Mr. Johnstone is the youngest son of Mr. Alexander Johnstone, farmer, and was born in the parish of Alva, Banffshire, Scotland, in 1835. He was educated at Bogtown district school, Aberhider, and afterwards apprenticed with Mr. Thomas Andrew, cabinetmaker, Turiff, and worked as journeyman in Aberdeen until he emigrated to Otago by the “Peter Denny,” in 1865. On landing, Mr. Johnstone worked in Dunedin at the new buildings being erected for the Bank of Otago, and subsequently at Edendale estate, then under the management of Mr. W. M. Gall. After that he commenced business at Milton. Mr. Johnstone has devoted a great deal of his leisure time to the promotion of temperance reform, and to musical efforts in connection with the Milton Presbyterian church. He married Margaret, daughter of Mr. Stewart, and has three children.

Parlane, John , Tailor and Clothier, Union Street, Milton. Bankers, National Bank of New Zealand. This business was founded in 1883, by the late Mr. James Murray, who was succeeded by his apprentice and journeyman, Mr. Parlane, in 1893. Mr. Parlane is the third son of the late Mr. James Parlane, farmer, of North Tokomairiro, and was educated at Fairfax school. He is known throughout the Tokomairiro district for the excellence of his workmanship, and for the variety and choiceness of his stock of goods. Mr. Parlane is vice-president of the Milton Bowling Club, and at the local competition in 1896–97, he won Mr. James Allan's special prize of a pair of silver-mounted bowls. He is also a member of Lodge St. John, 461, Scottish Constitution, and of Court Bruce, No. 4526, Ancient Order of Foresters.

Bryce, J. And T. (James Bryce and Thomas Bryce), General Blacksmiths and Farriers, Union Street, Milton. This firm was founded in 1863, by the late Mr. James Bryce, in conjunction with his brother, Mr. Thomas Bryce, who still carries on the business, assisted by his three nephews. One special feature of the firm's trade is the manufacture of agricultural machinery, in connection with which it does a large business amongst the settlers of the Tokomairiro district.

Mr. Thomas Bryce , Senior, was born in Strathaven, Lanarkshire, Scotland, and learned his trade at Chappleton. He arrived at Port Chalmers in October, 1862, and joined his brother at Fairfax, Tokomairiro, where they commenced business. On the death of Mr. James Bryce, in 1889, he admitted two of his nephews into partnership, Mr. Thomas Bryce, who is a widower, was married to Miss Isabella Fleming, of Strathaven, Lanarkshire.

Mr. T. Bryce.

Mr. T. Bryce.

Mr. Thomas Bryce , Junior, eldest son of Mr. James Bryce, was born in Milton in 1867, and was educated at the local High School. He was then apprenticed to his father, and has ever since been connected with the firm as journeyman and part proprietor. Mr. Bryce is an active Freemason; he was elected Worshipful Master of Lodge St. John, 461, S C., Milton, and afterwards held the office of secretary. In 1896 he was married to Eliza, daughter of Mr. George Lindsay, farmer, Tokomairiro.

Mr. James A. Bryce , second son of Mr. James Bryce, was also born in Milton, in 1869, and was educated at the local High School. He was apprenticed to his father, and subsequently worked as a journeyman in Palmerston North and at Waikouaiti. He is a Freemason, and joined Lodge St. John, 461, S. C., Milton, in 1891, affiliated with the Lodge at Waikouaiti, and was elected Worshipful Master in 1898. In 1897 he was married to Isabella, daughter of Mr. McPherson, farmer.

The Bruce Woollen Company's Factory at Milton stands on four acres and a half of land, and consists of a large brick building, which was erected in 1902, to replace the old building destroyed by fire in 1301. The mill is fitted throughout with electric light, and is most conveniently situated as regards water supply and railway communication, as a fine stream of water runs past, and there is a private railway siding. About ninety hands are employed, and the machinery, which is of the very latest description, has been specially imported from England. The first process in the manufacture of the wool is to thoroughly cleanse it from all impurities, and classify it according to its value. One of Mc-Naught's latest pattern scouring machines, capable of treating two thousand pounds of wool per day, is then used to remove the grease, and the scoured wool passes to the dyeing house, where six vats are in constant operation for dyeing in various colours. A large hydro-extractor, by Messrs Watson, Laidlaw, and Company, of Glasgow, extracts all the water from the dyed article, which is further dried by hot air supplied in a large drying machine. After being teased, the wool is conveyed to the carding room, where three carding machines, fitted with automatic feeders, are in operation. The spinning department is supplied with three mules, and altogether there are 1200 spindles, manufactured by Brooks and Doxey, of Manchester. Yarns and fingerings go direct to page 671 the twisting frames, and for tweed weaving there are twenty looms—manufactured by Messrs Hattersley and Sons—fitted with six boxes on each side, and running at ninety-five picks a minute. All traces of oil and other impurities are removed in two washing machines, after which the article goes through a course of treatment on one of Sykes and Son's fast-running milling stocks. Blaukets and tweeds are put through a gig for raising the pile. Two of Barnes and Son's cropping machines finish the operations, as far as machinery is concerned. White goods are dried in the open air, but tweeds, rugs, and coloured materials are dried by a Whitley and Son's drying machine. The chief productions of the factory are tweeds, rugs, blankets, and yarns; and 3,600 pounds of coarse wool and 1,800 pounds of fine wool are put through weekly. The Bruce tweeds have won a reputation for their reliability, and the rugs and blankets manufactured have from the first comanded the market.

Mr. Charles Grey , Secretary and General Manager of the Bruce Woollen Manufacturing Company, is the fifth son of the late Mr. John George Grey, of Millburn. Mr. Grey was educated at Millburn and Milton, and at the Oamaru High School. He followed mercantile life in Dunedin for a time, and, in 1897, was appointed General Manager and Secretary of the Bruce Woollen Manufacturing Company. Mr. Grey is a member of the Milton Borough Council, secretary to the Bowling and Angling Societies, a member of the committee of the Horticultural Society, and a member of the Milton High School committee. He married a daughter of Mr. W. Bolton, one of the pioneers of Otago.

Gray, James And Sons , Milton. This firm was originally founded by Messrs Smith and Hibbard, and after these gentlemen dissolved partnership, it was carried on by Messrs Hibbard and Soutter. Then when Mr. Hibbard left the business, Messrs Hislop and Gray entered into partnership with Mr. Soutter as the firm of Soutter, Hislop and Gray. In the course of time Messrs Soutter and Hislop sold out to Mr. Gray, who successfully carried on the business till the time of his death.

Mr. James Gray was born in Edinburgh, and was in business in that town for a short time. He then entered into the employment of Mr. John Robertson, of Ayr, and was with him till 1861. Mr. Gray then decided to try his fortunes in the colonies, and left for New Zealand in 1861, landing in Dunedin on Christmas Day of that year. His first situation was with Messrs Barron and Campbell in Rattray Street, and thence he went to Tokomairiro to Messrs Smith and Hibbard. Thenceforward, for the rest of
Bruce Dairy Factory.

Bruce Dairy Factory.

The Late Mr. J. Gray.

The Late Mr. J. Gray.

page 672
Messrs J. Gray And Sons' Premises.

Messrs J. Gray And Sons' Premises.

his life, he was one of the best known and most widely respected business men in Otago. Some years before his death Mr. Gray took his two sons (Alexander George and James) into partnership with him, and the firm was then known as that of James Gray and Sons, under which name it still trades. Along with his business of general merchandise Mr. Gray had for several years been proprietor of the Bruce Dairy Factory, which is now leased by the Taieri and Peninsula Milk Supply Company. Mr. Gray died in April, 1898, in Melbourne, to which he had gone for the benefit of his health.
Jones, Edmund B. , Pipe and Brick Manufacturer, Britannia Brick Works, Mil- ton. These works were established in 1868 by the late Mr. George Jones, and, including the clay fields, cover an area of about twelve acres of land. The plant consists of two large down-draught kilns, which are stoked all round with twelve fire holes, and a Bradley and Craven brick machine, of the latest pattern. The plant is driven by a 20 horse-power engine, built by Kincaid and McQueen, of Dunedin. About half-a-million bricks, and 150,000 feet of drain pipes (in sizes varying from three inches to twelve inches in diameter) are turned out yearly. The pipe machine used at the works was erected and designed by Mr. Jones, on the lines of the old pug-mill system. Mr. Jones was born at Milton, in 1889 and was educated at the Milton High School. He subsequently joined his father at the brick works, and when his father died he took complete charge of the business, which he has since conducted most successfully. Mr. Jones is a member of Court Bruce, Ancient Order of Foresters, Milton, and was at one time an active member of the local cricket club and brass band.

Mr. George Jones , sometime of Milton, was born at Uxbridge, England, in 1830, and learned the trade of brick manufacturing at West Drayton. He arrived in Victoria, Australia, in 1859, by the ship “Owen Glendower,” and came over to Otago in 1861. After a few years spent at the goldfields, and in carting and farming in the Tokomairiro district, he started the Britannia Brick Works, which he conducted up to the time of his death, in January, 1901. Mr. Jones married a daughter of Mr. Cockburn, of Edinburgh, Scotland, and had one son, who succeeded him in the ownership of the Britannia Brick Works at Milton.

Duthie, Edward Martin , Farmer, “Janefield,” Milton. Mr. Duthie was born in 1847, and was the first male child born in Dunedin. He was educated at the Fairfax school, the Nelson College, and the Otago Boys' High School. After two years spent at “Greenfield” in learning the rudiments of agriculture, Mr. Duthie opened a general store and butchery business at Fairfax, and conducted it for seventeen years. Since 1892 Mr. Duthie has been engaged in farming on property left to him under his father's will, and resides in the old home built by his father in the year 1851. Mr. Duthie has been a member of the Bruce County Council, the Tokomairiro Road Board, and the Fairfax school committee. He was married, in 1880. to Miss Christina McKay, of Fairfax, and has a family of two sons.

Mr. James Dickson was born at Haddington, near Edinburgh, in 1809, and what education he obtained was gained by himself during his term of apprenticeship. After completing his indentures, Mr. Dickson worked as a journeyman for Messrs J. and C. McGibbon, one of the largest firms of builders in Edinburgh, and subsequently became the firm's foreman. In 1854 he emigrated by the ship “Australia” to Melbourne, where he commenced business as a builder, and followed the trade until 1861, when he sailed for Otago during the height of the great gold “rush” at Gabriel's Gully. Mr. Dickson worked at his trade in Dunedin for a time, and then entered into partnership with Mr. Dickinson, later of Christchurch, in a storekeeping business at Glenore, near Milton. The following year, however, Mr. Dickson settled at Milton, where he remained until 1886, when he retired to Dunedin. Mr. Dickson was one of the first councillors to be elected for the borough of Milton.

Mr. Alexander Duthie , sometime of Milton, was born near Dundee, Scotland, on the 16th of March, 1814, and came to New Zealand in the ship “Lady Nugent.” which arrived in Wellington in 1841. He first page 673 came to Otago in 1818, with a survey party, under the supervision of Mr Kettle. Mr. Duthie, in partnership with Mr. James Cullen, built the first jetty in Dimedin. In 1851 he removed to the Tokomairiro district, and started farming, which he continued up to the time of his death, in January, 1863. Mrs. Duthie, who died in October, 1897, in her eighty-second year, was a native of Moneymore, County Mondonderry, Ireland, and came out to the colony in the same ship us her husband, with whom she entered into wedlock shortly after their arrival in Wellington. There is a surviving family of four sons and two daughters.

Mr. James Inglis , sometime of “Burnside,” Milton, was the second son of Mr. Inglis, sometime of “Middleton,” Stirling, Otago, and was born in the year 1831, in the
The Late Mr. J. Inglis.

The Late Mr. J. Inglis.

parish of Old Harnstocks, Berwickshire, Scotland. He was educated at the parish school, and afterwards worked as a farm labourer until he left for New Zealand in 1860 by the “Robert Henderson.” Mr. Inglis first obtained employment as a bullock driver with Mr. Thomas Murray, of Mount Stuart station, near Milton. He remained with Mr. Murray until the following year, when he purchased a team of horses and a waggon, and commenced carting general merchandise, etc., to the goldfields at Gabriel's Gully, Dunstan and Lake Wakatipu. This occupation he carried on for five years, and afterwards at Milton until 1872, when he leased “Burnside.” During his long residence in Milton, Mr. Inglis took an active and prominent interest in furthering the welfare of the district, especially in connection with agriculture, education, church management, local self-government, and friendly societies. For thirteen years he held the office of secretary to the Tokomairiro Farmers' Club (besides being elected president), but resigned the secretaryship in consequence of failing eyesight. He represented the South' Ward in the Milton Borough Council for three years, and also was elected chairman and member of the local school committee. As a Forester, Mr. Inglis was one of the promoters and founders of Court Bruce, No 4526, which was established in 1865. On the 20th of January, 1854, he was married to Ann, daughter of Mr. George Skeleton, and they hatl four children. Mr. Inglis died on the 26th of April, 1902.
Mr. Charles Falconer , sometime of “Glenkilrie,” Milton, was born in 1826, at Dalnaid, Glenkilrie estate, Perthshire, Scotland. He was brought up on his father's farm, and came to Otago with his wife, by the ship “Palmyra,” in 1858. Shortly after his arrival he and his young wife walked to Tokomairiro; the journey took them two days, and at night they had to sleep under a flax-bush—a thing not uncommon in the days of the pioneers. Mr. Falconer was employed by the late Mr. Edward Martin, and afterwards by the late Mr. Gillies; and he then started farming on his own account, on fifty acres of land—the nucleus of “Glenkilrie.” He gradually increased his holding, and at his death the property consisted of 800 acres, which extended to the boundary of the Coal Company's reserve Like many of the early colonists, Mr. Falconer took part in the Gabriel's Gully rush, and met with considerable success. He was a member of the old Tokomairiro Road Board from its inception, and one of the first members of the Akatore school committee, of which he was both chairman and clerk. He was also an energetic director and shareholder, of the Coal Gully Company. At his death, in February, 1895, Mr. Falconer left four
The Late Mr. C. Falconer.

The Late Mr. C. Falconer.

daughters and two sons. Mrs. Falconer died in 1887.
The Late Mrs C. Falconer.

The Late Mrs C. Falconer.

Mr. Samuel Fogg was born in Bury, Lancashire, England, in 1846, and was apprenticed as a mechanical engineer with the well-known firm of Messrs Walker and Hacking, engineers and cotton machine manufacturers, Lancashire. After completing his indentures he worked as a journeyman in England and the United States. In 1878 he emigrated to Otago by the ship “Wellingtoin.”
Mr. S. Fogg.

Mr. S. Fogg.

page 674 and commenced storekeeping at Burnside, Green Island. He and his son, Mr. Thomas Fogg, who is now a dentist in Dnnedin, afterwards carried on an extensive business at Milton, where they had a monopoly of the local fruit trade. Mr. Fogg was married, in 1871, to Alice, daughter of Mr. Adam Hall, of Bury, Lancashire, and they have one son. In August, 1904, Mr. Fogg sold his business at Milton, and went to live in retirement in Dnnedin.
Mr. Daniel Mcpherson , sometime a general merchant at Fairfax, near Milton, was born in 1858 on the ship “Palmyra,” whilst his parents wore on their way to Otago, New Zealand. The family settled in the Tokonmirivo district, and Mr. McTherson was educated at the old school (prior to the establishment of the present district high school), which was conducted in the old court-houso. He was apprenticed to the firm of Messrs Soutter, Hislop and Gray (now known as Messrs James Gray and Sons), general merchants, Milton,
The Late Mr. D. McPherson.

The Late Mr. D. McPherson.

in whose employment he remained twenty years. In 1892 he became proprietor of the business which had been originally conducted at Fairfax by Mr. E. M. Duthie. Mr. McPherson was a member of the Fairfax school committee, the Milton Bowling Club, and of Court Bruce, No. 4526, Ancient Order of Foresters. In 1891 he was married to Jane, daughter of the late Mr. Robert Thomson. He died on the 19th of November, 1902.
Mr. Frederic Twiss was born at Cambridge, England, and after leaving school spent three years at the Hoyal Agricultural College, Cirencealer. In 1851 he emigrated to Melbourne, but in 1858, after visiting various Australian gold diggings, he returned to England by the ship “Boyal Charier.” Mr. Twiss came to New Zealand by the ship “Nourmahal,” and took up 500 acres of land at Lovell's Flat, where he was one of the first settlers, and there he farmed till 1870. He then left his property, and bought another farm near Milton, and worked it until 1876, when he retired from active life. Mr. Twiss has been a member of road boards and school committees, and is now, on the Milton Domain Board. Although a Freemason, he is unattached in New Zealand. He is an enthusiastic bowler, and the winner of numerous gold medals and other prizes.
Mr. F. Twiss.

Mr. F. Twiss.

Mr. Twiss has been twice married. His first wife died in 1699, and he took as his second wife Miss Mary Jaye Martin, daughter of Mr. James Martin, one of the pioneer settlers of the Tokomairiro district.