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Arts and Crafts of the Cook Islands

Figure 166.—Rarotongan carved gong, Ngatangiia village. Shows upper surface and side: upper opening shows curved ends (1, 1) and a longer and wider slit (2) than in Mangaian gong; curved incised lines present on either side of ends of opening. Ends are decorated with crossed lines (3) corresponding in position to raised bands of Mangaian gongs and extending around gong except on upper surface. End knobs (4) are cut in at bases, are not triangular in section, and are uncarved

Figure 166.—Rarotongan carved gong, Ngatangiia village. Shows upper surface and side: upper opening shows curved ends (1, 1) and a longer and wider slit (2) than in Mangaian gong; curved incised lines present on either side of ends of opening. Ends are decorated with crossed lines (3) corresponding in position to raised bands of Mangaian gongs and extending around gong except on upper surface. End knobs (4) are cut in at bases, are not triangular in section, and are uncarved.

Figure 166.—Rarotongan carved gong, Ngatangiia village. Shows upper surface and side: upper opening shows curved ends (1, 1) and a longer and wider slit (2) than in Mangaian gong; curved incised lines present on either side of ends of opening. Ends are decorated with crossed lines (3) corresponding in position to raised bands of Mangaian gongs and extending around gong except on upper surface. End knobs (4) are cut in at bases, are not triangular in section, and are uncarved.