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Arts and Crafts of the Cook Islands

Figure 25.—Mangaian fan technique: a, the two-ply lashing thread, attached (1) near distal end of handle tang (2), passes down on front of tang and makes two transverse turns (3) around butt ends of first pair of leaflet wefts (4, 4) which are placed against sides of tang. Thread descends on front and makes two transverse turns (5) around butt ends of next pair of wefts (6, 6) and continues until all weft pairs are attached. Leaflet wefts are about 0.37 inch wide and are attached to tang about …

Figure 25.—Mangaian fan technique: a, the two-ply lashing thread, attached (1) near distal end of handle tang (2), passes down on front of tang and makes two transverse turns (3) around butt ends of first pair of leaflet wefts (4, 4) which are placed against sides of tang. Thread descends on front and makes two transverse turns (5) around butt ends of next pair of wefts (6, 6) and continues until all weft pairs are attached. Leaflet wefts are about 0.37 inch wide and are attached to tang about 0.5 inch between pairs. b, commencing at bottom, lowest pair of wefts (4, 4) are twisted over pair above (6, 6) on their respective sides and lashing cord (1) ascends on front of tang to point midway between butt lashings (7, 8) and makes two transverse turns (3) around tang to further fix lowest pair (4, 4). Next pair (6, 6) is then twisted over pair above and lashing thread, again ascending on front of tang to midway between butt lashings (8, 9), makes two transverse turns (5) around tang to further fix pair (6, 6). Second turn is placed below first and crosses it on left as it ascends to next position. Twisting and lashing is done consecutively with each pair in turn. c, handle is turned, and all wefts from below are crossed in simple check. Wefts have leaflet midrib on upper edge. Commencing to plait on one side, lowest weft (1) is given a half-twist to place midrib to outer edge and plaited in check through wefts above it so that it lies parallel with tang (2). Next weft (3) is treated in a similar way and so consecutively until required width of one side is reached. Portion plaited forms lower half of lozenge. Turning of last weft forms outer angle of lozenge-shaped fan, and weft itself forms outer edge of upper half of lozenge, and crossing wefts are doubled over it and ends passed under two or three crossing wefts on opposite side. Though first wefts run parallel with tang in first part of course, they incline inward in later part. Other side of fan is plaited and end portion is completed by wefts from either side crossing each other. d, edges of fan are bound with strips of coconut leaflets (1) doubled over them and fixed with a two-ply fine coir cord which passes around binding and through wefts in a continuous series of half-hitches or overhand knots (2). In Mangaian fan, a characteristic sennit pattern (3) in zigzag form with three courses was made with the binding near handle. Back of tang (4) is shown divided into panels by transverse narrow grooves through which lashing thread passes so that it is not visible on surface as in the Wesleyan University fan. Each panel is carved with two K-motifs with their arms toward middle line. Upper part of handle is wrapped in white tapa (5) and tied with thin coir cord. e, on front of Horniman Museum fan, four strands of fine sennit braid come through in the middle line from a point opposite distal end of tang and descend to disappear under bark-cloth wrapping of upper half of handle. A single strand of fine human hair braid (2) is worked back and forth across four sennit braids in check. On back, the four braids descend in a pair on each side of tang and also disappear under cloth covering of handle.

Figure 25.—Mangaian fan technique: a, the two-ply lashing thread, attached (1) near distal end of handle tang (2), passes down on front of tang and makes two transverse turns (3) around butt ends of first pair of leaflet wefts (4, 4) which are placed against sides of tang. Thread descends on front and makes two transverse turns (5) around butt ends of next pair of wefts (6, 6) and continues until all weft pairs are attached. Leaflet wefts are about 0.37 inch wide and are attached to tang about 0.5 inch between pairs. b, commencing at bottom, lowest pair of wefts (4, 4) are twisted over pair above (6, 6) on their respective sides and lashing cord (1) ascends on front of tang to point midway between butt lashings (7, 8) and makes two transverse turns (3) around tang to further fix lowest pair (4, 4). Next pair (6, 6) is then twisted over pair above and lashing thread, again ascending on front of tang to midway between butt lashings (8, 9), makes two transverse turns (5) around tang to further fix pair (6, 6). Second turn is placed below first and crosses it on left as it ascends to next position. Twisting and lashing is done consecutively with each pair in turn. c, handle is turned, and all wefts from below are crossed in simple check. Wefts have leaflet midrib on upper edge. Commencing to plait on one side, lowest weft (1) is given a half-twist to place midrib to outer edge and plaited in check through wefts above it so that it lies parallel with tang (2). Next weft (3) is treated in a similar way and so consecutively until required width of one side is reached. Portion plaited forms lower half of lozenge. Turning of last weft forms outer angle of lozenge-shaped fan, and weft itself forms outer edge of upper half of lozenge, and crossing wefts are doubled over it and ends passed under two or three crossing wefts on opposite side. Though first wefts run parallel with tang in first part of course, they incline inward in later part. Other side of fan is plaited and end portion is completed by wefts from either side crossing each other. d, edges of fan are bound with strips of coconut leaflets (1) doubled over them and fixed with a two-ply fine coir cord which passes around binding and through wefts in a continuous series of half-hitches or overhand knots (2). In Mangaian fan, a characteristic sennit pattern (3) in zigzag form with three courses was made with the binding near handle. Back of tang (4) is shown divided into panels by transverse narrow grooves through which lashing thread passes so that it is not visible on surface as in the Wesleyan University fan. Each panel is carved with two K-motifs with their arms toward middle line. Upper part of handle is wrapped in white tapa (5) and tied with thin coir cord. e, on front of Horniman Museum fan, four strands of fine sennit braid come through in the middle line from a point opposite distal end of tang and descend to disappear under bark-cloth wrapping of upper half of handle. A single strand of fine human hair braid (2) is worked back and forth across four sennit braids in check. On back, the four braids descend in a pair on each side of tang and also disappear under cloth covering of handle.